What range torque wrench to get?

I'm starting to do my own servicing and maintenance on my bike. Zero mechanical experience but I follow youtube videos and the shop manual for procedures. 

Looking to get a torque wrench but they're expensive. If I could get away with having just 1, what torque range should I get one for? To cover most if not all of the basic maintenance work.

Btw, I ride a Yamaha Fzn150 aka Fz16 v2.

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11 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    owner's manual is your friend...

  • fuzzy
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    The critical bolts are the small ones (thery break easiest) 4 -24 foot pound covers those. For the rest use a ring spanner to do them up as tightly as you can without stressing yourself. Ring (I think Americans call them box spanners) are designed so that reasonable force applied with them gives close to optimum torque for the majority of nuts & bolts. 

    Special bolts will be mentioned in the manual along with the required torque.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    When I was a lad and there were a group of us all setting out as motorcyclists we used to club together and buy an expensive tool and share it.

    12-60Nm will cover most heavy jobs. Remember to ease it off otherwise it will need to be recalibrated.

  • adam
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    you can simply rent one from autozone on the rare occasion that you ever need one. 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I recommend two one 1/4" drive calibrated in inch-pounds and one 3/8" drive calibrated in foot pounds. If you can't afford both, you shouldn't be doing any major motorcycle maintenance. If you can only afford one, get the wrench calibrated in inch-pounds. It will help prevent you from breaking the smaller sized screws and studs, or over-torquing aluminum covers.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    For just regular maintenance, you really do not need one.  If you rebuilding the engine, maybe it is time to get one.  I have my own torque wrench, elbow click type.

  • 2 months ago

    Look in your manual for your spark plug torque. Thereyago. I prefer beam torque wrenches. No moving parts (except for the handle, which moves a little), no batteries, cheaper, lasts a long time. My 3/8 is 40 years old and still works great. Buy as you go. Your rear wheel lugs may require 120 ft-lbs (or equivalent nm). That might be a 1/2 inch drive socket... so buy a 1/2 inch drive torque wrench for that. I have three TW's: 1/4 drive, 3/8 drive, 1/2 drive. That'll cover it. I don't trust cheap clicker wrenches at all--a little internal rust and their calibration is shot. An alternative is to buy an electronic torque adapter for a regular socket handle. Haven't used one, they require batteries, and they are kinda klunky and awkward. Your choice.

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  • 2 months ago

    You don't need a torque wrench unless you're taking the cylinder heads off. If you do plan on removing them look at the head bolt torques and buy a torque wrench in that range.

  • 2 months ago

    Ft-Lbs 0-100 or 150. 

  • 2 months ago

    Pick the top 5 repairs and maintenance tasks you think you are most likely to attempt to perform. Check the manuals and YouTube videos to see what torque values you'll need, and buy the appropriate torque wrench.

    My guess is that something that goes up to 150 ft-lbs will be adequate for everything on your bike. You might find some places that need lower values and if/when you run into that you can pick up a smaller torque wrench so you can be more precise at those lower values.

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