Do i need to give comma before "which" in this sentence? ?

In our conventional society, women are generally not allowed to go outside without any companion after marriage which restricts their right as a human being.

i would really appreciate if you could tell me when to use comma and when to not before which.

Thanks in advance.

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  • 1 month ago

    In our conventional society, women are generally not allowed to go outside without any companion after marriage which restricts their right as a human being. = "marriage" restricts their right as a human being.

    In our conventional society, women are generally not allowed to go outside without any companion after marriage,  which restricts their right as a human being. =  "not being able to go out without a companion" restricts their right as as human being.

  • 1 month ago

    In our conventional society, women are generally not allowed to go outside without any companion after marriage, which restricts their rights as human beings.

  • 1 month ago

    We need a comma before a  non-restrictive relative clause that is a clause which provides information that can be left out without affecting the meaning or structure of the sentence. However, we don't use a comma before a  restrictive relative clause which provides essential information about the noun to which it refers. such a clause cannot be left out of the sentence without affecting the meaning.

    Examples:It reminded him of the house that he used to live in. Here the relative clause is essential and answer the question (which house?).The items, which are believed to be family heirlooms, included a grandfather clock worth around £3,000. The claues can be left out and the meaning is complete: The items included a grandfather clock worth around £3,000.

    Now I think you can judge yourself if you need a comma or not.

    taken from https://www.lexico.com/grammar/relative-clauses

  • 1 month ago

    Correctly written:

    In our conventional society women are generally not allowed to go outside without any companion after marriage, which restricts their right as a human being.

    The comma after "society" is not needed or desirable.  But the comma before "which" is needed to separate its following phrase from "marriage" and make it clear that the phrase that follows which is modifying the entire previous phrase and not just "marriage."

    Source(s): Several college courses in creative and technical writing.
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  • 1 month ago

    Yes because the sentence after which is parallel to the first one, it is a new idea been said.

  • John
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    you write it like this: 

    "In our convention society women,(you need to identify what a 'woman' is), cannot go outside, (you need to identify whst outside mesns), without a 'companion', (hello?), after marriage(?) which restricts their obvous rights as an individual.

    wadda you know about human beings you cant even speak a simple language. oooo....ooooo...ah...ah...its all a sentance no pauses....shakes branch...

  • 1 month ago

    I would say that you need a comma before "which" as the phrase after "which" implies additional/further information. In the line, "...women are generally not allowed to go outside without any companion after marriage...", the sentence means that women are not allowed to go outside alone after marriage. This is then continued by the line, "which restricts their right as a human being.", which means that married women have restricted rights than single women. Both lines relate to each other but the line after "which" further explains the meaning of the line before the word "which". The sentence should therefore be, "In our conventional society, women are generally not allowed to go outside without any companion after marriage, which restricts their right as a human being." Although, even without the comma, the sentence is still pretty understandable and straightforward. 

    I hope this helps :D

  • 1 month ago

    While people could still understand what you are saying if you omitted the comma before "which", it is actually grammatically correct to place a comma there. 

    I think what is complicated is that you already use a comma in the sentence after "society", but you still need one before "which."

    Ex. My friend gave me a pack of Skittles, which are my favorite candy. 

    A comma is absolutely necessary here, so why wouldn't it be there? 

  • 1 month ago

    Yes, you certainly need a comma after "which". In this sentence, "which" refers to everything before it.

    Look at it this way:In our conventional society, women are generally not allowed to go outside without any companion after marriage.This restricts their rights as a human being.

    "This" means the WHOLE of the preceding sentence.

    Without the comma, the sentence would mean that "marriage" restricts women's rights as human beings. But of course it's not marriage itself that restricts women; it's the fact that after marriage they're not allowed outside without a companion.

  • Bob
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    Yes, you DO need a comma.

    In our conventional society, women are generally not allowed to go outside without any companion after marriage, which restricts their right as a human being.

    Without the comma, the sentence does not make clear that it's the fact they cannot go outside without a companion which restricts their right and potentially makes it seem as though it's marriage that restricts their right. Adding the comma removes any confusion and makes the intended meaning explicitly clear.

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