What's stressed and unstressed in the slang word "whatcha."...?

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    WHATcha is how it's stressed.

  • 3 months ago

    It's not a slang word. It's the result of stress timing in English. Important words get the stress, and everything else gets pushed together in the rush to get to the next content word.  In the questions "What are you doing?" the key words are "what" and "do". So "are you" gets shortened, and the phonological rules for a "y" sound after "t" or "d" becomes a "ch"-- just as in the word "education", often pronounce ed-ja-ca-tion.

    The same process changes "Where are you going to go?" to "Where you gonna go?"

  • RP
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    The first syllable is stressed and the second isn't.

  • 3 months ago

    you might occasionally here whaCHA alone, as a joke or a exclamation but typically the slurring and de-emphasis happens with the contracted syllable, which is the "cha" part.  the entire point is that the word you is de-emphasized and converted to "cha".

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    “What” is stressed and “cha” is unstressed

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