San
Lv 5

Do these sentences mean the same thing?

A. A man dressed in a vampire costume blocked the path.

B. A man in a vampire costume blocked the path.

Can I omit the "dressed" without changing the meaning of the sentence?

Thanks!

8 Answers

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  • John
    Lv 4
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes, of course.There are many ways to express one thing in English. Here, the first sentence contains transitive verb "dress" in its past participle "dressed“, which is used as an attribute in this sentence.Therefore, we can return this sentence to its original shape—attributive clause. 

    A: A man who was dressed in a vampire costume blocked the path. 

    Attribute clauses always play a role in emphasising or embellishing the noun in front of it.People can feel this when you use that kind of clause or Verb Past Participle used as an attribute. They are the same thing.

    B: A man in a vampire costume blocked the path. A simple expression for clothes that people wear.

    For example: The pupile in red is my son.

    Yes, you don't need to add a verb to emphasize "dress" in oral English.Well, in written English, you may find more sentence from Sentence A.This can make their work seem to be more literary.

    • San
      Lv 5
      1 month agoReport

      Thanks!

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  • 1 month ago

    A man who wore a vampire costume had blocked the path.

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  • 1 month ago

    The sentences mean exactly the same thing, and (B)  is much more concise.  BTW: "Dressed" is not necessary in either sentence.

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes; yes again.

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  • 1 month ago

    They mean the same thing. You don't need "dressed" in the sentences.   

    A man in a vampire costume blocked the path. 

    A man in a vampire costume was blocking the path.      

      

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  • blank
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Hey San.

    Yes and YES!   You are spot on.

    Now you MIGHT simply say "A vampire blocked the path."   

    Depending upon one's beliefs - the "costume" would be completely understood.   Others would be like "good thing I always carry garlic bulbs, Holy water and a wooden stake."   =_)

    Hope this helps.

    • JustSassy1 month agoReport

      If you mean it to be a costume, you need to express that.  A vampire--real or imagined, is not the same as a man in a vampire costume!

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Yes, it can be omitted because "dressed" is implicit in B to an extent that it eliminates any need to make it explicit.

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  • PR
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    They appear to have the same meaning, but with fewer words in the second sentence.

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