Whats the key to seasoning food properly & amazingly when cooking, how do you know when something is either not seasoned enough or too much.?

13 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Use a combo of acidic, sweet, sour, salty and umami to flavor it, tasting after each addition and adjusting as desired. You’ll get the knack after a little practice as you’ll find characteristics of certain foods that benefit more from tartness, salt, etc. 

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 month ago

    The ultimate struggle!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 month ago

    I taste it.........................

  • denise
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Its all down to your palate,  I'd add 'some' seasonings, then taste as I go, adding if I think the dish needs it.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • John
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    As much as I don't always think long replies are worthwhile, Falafel's is pretty spot on. The only thing I would add to it is that most seasoning happens as you cook, and I mean that if you taste right after salting it will be salty. Let it cook for two minutes more and it will be just perfect. Taste it. Especially things that really need seasoning - usually salt to begin with. Potatoes, soups, beans, meat. The day I picked up the salt shaker was the day my food came alive. I was a product of the salt=evil 70's cooking days.

  • 1 month ago

    Learn what flavors go with what food, and constantly taste as you go. If you are not tasting your food, you are missing out on learning the flavor profiles you like and how to improve them.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • kswck2
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    For meats, season 'from a height'. The seasoning will spread more evenly. For a dish that is already cooking, season by taste. Even the best chefs do this. 

    People historically Under season foods, particularly concerning salt. Salt serves several purposes-including tenderizing along with flavoring, curing, etc. 

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    The best way to season food properly is by taste.

    I'm afraid that, really, no one is going to be amazed by seasoning (unless they have led a VERY sheltered life) - don't set your expectations too high!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Salt salt salt. Most people under-season their food with salt, or don’t even add it at all if “the recipe doesn’t call for it”, my mother’s favorite excuse why her food is usually bland. Salt and acidity enhance the flavor of food, as well as stimulates your taste buds to perceive while eating. If you can noticeably taste the salt as if it were a French fry, you’ve added too much and most people would call that too salty. You want to go a little under that threshold. Don’t forget pepper too, but the larger specs of pepper you have available, the less you need to add.

    The second bit is acid; a squeeze of lemon juice, lime, wine, vinegar, distilled vinegar, anything acidic that won’t distract from what you’re eating. If you’re making any kind of bean or lentil, you need to add something to “brighten/lift” the flavor because it’s so muddy and earthy. Acid also significantly cuts the fatty taste of food like lemon in caesar or Hollandaise, pickles on fried chicken, or tomatoes with cheese. If the flavor seems dull but you’ve added enough salt and seasonings, add a small splash of vinegar, any kind will do, but white is stronger than wine vinegars.

    A technique cooks adopted from old school French chefs is to season with every new addition. For a classic Bolognese (meat sauce) a professional cook would season after adding each main component: browned meat, mirepoix, garlic, tomato paste, red wine n crushed tomatoes. Someone with less experience might be inclined to season in one whole lump some after the bulk of ingredients have been added, but this is a very inaccurate way to season since some hands can be heavier on salt than others. It’s much harder to take salt out once it’s already been mixed in. The other reason is it goes against the philosophy of seasoning as you go, enhancing the flavor of each component while it’s still cooking individually to develop even more. 

    You might not be adding enough variety of herbs and spices which is making the taste pretty flat. My typical blend of Mexican spices are oregano, cumin, coriander, paprika, cayenne, garlic powder, onion powder, and ground chipotle. Now that’s certainly a large mix, but it’s necessary for a cuisine that’s very heavy on spices. Spice mixes are an easy fix to this, but much costlier than simply adding your own yourself. If you’re making food from a specific cuisine, add in some herbs or spices that naturally pair well in that culture.

    Above all, taste as you go, sometimes even twice per step. The only way to know before food reaches the table if it’s weak is to try it and assess beforehand. Sometimes even I get too fixed on the taste and take one more spoonful to see if anything can be improved. The first bite always tastes the strongest, so sometimes that second bite is necessary.

    Source(s): https://youtu.be/2Mn9oW39cQk An interview with Michelin chef Thomas Keller, where he talks a lot about what was mentioned above
    • Nice answer. Too bad the asker will continue to ask the same question for at least a few more years ;) Meanwhile - I can't tell you how many times a splash of vinegar has saved my food. it goes from meh to yeehaw in a split second. It helps that I have a variety of nice vinegars to play with.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Pretty much practice and tasting your own cooking.  Cook a dish you love to eat.  Taste it.  What is it missing?  Add it.  Taste it. Repeat. 

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.