Minced meat in vegetable leaves?

There are many dishes where minced meat, often with rice, is enveloped in vegetable leaves (cabbage, kale, grapevine,...) and cooked like that. Most of such dishes I know stem from Middle Eastern cuisine. Are there similar dishes in your cuisine? What they are called and how they are prepared?

Update:

In Turkish cuisine, for example, 'dolma' means 'stuffed thing' and 'sarma' means 'wrapped thing.' Here I am asking about 'wrapped things' like those with grape or cabbage leaves. I know there are 'dolmas' around the globe as well, like stuffed potatoes, zucchini, tomatoes, bell peppers even onions (the last one sounds odd but it's delicious).

Update 2:

Great answers. It's a pity I can choose only one. Curiously, Sweetness' Canadian version is very similar to how my mom used to make it on the other side of the world. It appears to be a variation on recipes for halupci and golabki. Sweet Swedish Kaldolmar by Anonymous, although geographically closer, is the most exotic to me, but I'll be glad to give it a try. Thank you all.

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    I am Canadian, and although most often times this dish is ethnic in origin, we have the common cabbage rolls, which are exactly how you described them at the beginning of your question. We use ground beef, about 1/2c of cooked rice*, an egg, half of one small minced onion, minced or powdered garlic depending on what is in the house at the time to taste, salt and pepper, sometimes a dash of hotsauce depending on who will be eating them, and sometimes grated cheese to be a bit different. Honestly this is a recipe that you can add as much or as little to flavor it as you want. We just mix that up and add probably about 1/4c to the middle of a boiled cabbage leaf and roll it up into a 'package'. The amount of meat mixture you use in each roll will definitely depend on the size of the cabbage leaf. Once you have your rolls put together, place them in a glass casserole dish, and add your tomato sauce. You can you ready made, or you can make your own, which ever you prefer. If I make my own, I use a large can of basic tomato sauce, add salt and pepper to taste and the other half of the onion you minced. Cook in the oven on 350* for about 1 1/2 hours. They are finished once you cut one open and the meat inside is totally cooked through with no pink. Sometimes for the last 5 minutes we have added bread crumbs and a bit more grated cheese, and broiled until golden brown. It is a very forgiving recipe and you can add a lot to it to make it how you would like it. 

    *You can use uncooked rice, but sometimes the rice would still be crunchy so we started just cooking a bit of rice ahead of time and adding that.

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  • denise
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    I believe they are a Greek dish,  'Dolmades', stuffed vine leaves, with minced meat, rice, seasoning, cooked / steamed, and served with a tomato sauce.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    They've made it all the way to Scandinavia with the name cabbage dolmar (dolme would be singular).  As you can see the name has been borrowed straight from Turkish.  The popular story is that they were brought back to Sweden in the early 1700s by Carl XII after exile in the Ottoman empire.  This may or may not be true as stuffed cabbage is common to every European country.  I suspect that it's partly true, that a Turkish version made its way north.  The earliest printed recipe is from the mid-1700s and is not only called "dolmar" but is very Turkish in using vine leaves, which few people would have had access to as well as being Turkish in overall style.

    The modern, "ordinary people," version around since the 1800s is always stuffed in white cabbage leaves.  The filling is made from "blandfärs" (a mixture of ground/minced beef and pork), rice porridge made from short grain rice, salt, white pepper, and sometimes marjoram, sometimes eggs are added to bind.  The rolls are first browned nicely and then braised in a shallow pan in a single, tightly packed layer.  Often golden, sugar syrup is added during the braising process.  Some people like it very sweet.

    The "correct" way to serve them is hot alongside plain boiled potatoes.  The meat juices can be dyed darker with gravy browning (called "soya" in older cookbooks, but really caramelised sugar) and poured over, but never thickened like gravy, or clarified butter can be poured over.  Lingon berry jam (similar to cranberry sauce but more astringent) is almost always also offered.  Many people like to put a bowl of "pressed cucumber" salad on the table as well.

    Since taking apart a white cabbage without breaking the leaves requires a lot of effort and some risk of being scalded most people prefer to buy them ready made.  It's more usual to make a "cabbage pudding" instead from the same ingredients but instead of stuffing the leaves filling and fried, shredded cabbage are layered in a baking dish and the whole thing is cooked in the oven before being sliced into squares and served.

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  • 1 month ago

    Stuffed cabbage entered American cooking mainly through European cultures such as German, Polish, Hungarian. Greeks used grape leaves. People used what they had available, which accounts for the differences. And while 'stuffed' whatever is the general idea, they all have their own names. For example, Americans call stuffed cabbage exactly that, while the Polish dish is called golabki.

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  • 1 month ago

     Cabbage rolls are very common and popular in many Eastern European countries. I am of German Russian heritage and my mother called that "haluptzy".  I am not sure what other countries call them.

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  • kswck2
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Stuffed grape leaves, stuffed cabbage with ground beef and rice.  Stuffed potatoes. Americans can basically stuff any kind of food into something else. Probably comes from  the Depression era, where there just wasn't enough to go around, so the cheaper stuff was stuffed into something else to make it go longer. 

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    • ckngbbbls
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      not true on the depression link though...stuffed cabbage goes waaaaay back to other countries but I think most ethnic groups do some stuffing of one food into another and always have.

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