Can I save a stock loss for a future year even if a have a stock gain in the same year as a loss?

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  • kswck2
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Nope. It is a first in first out situation when it comes to taxes. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Not by choice.  If the loss is at least $3000 more than the gain, then you can save an amount equal to the loss minus the gain and minus 3000.  You must use (and not save) an amount equal to the gain plus 3000 or you cannot save anything.

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  • 1 month ago

    Use it or lose it......even if you it doesn't help you very much or at all.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No. It goes in chronological order. Its not optional unless the circumstances allow it. or maybe demand it is a better word. 

    You can designate which lots of stock you sell for tax advantages as you choose.

    I tend to always sell the lot with the highest cost basis first. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Certainly there are situations where you can.

    Example: During a tax year you realize a capital loss of $10,000 on one stock and a capital gain of $2,500 on another stock. On your taxes you would have a net loss of $7,500 on the two transactions. You would use $3,000 of the loss to reduce ordinary income for the year and carry $4,500 of the loss forward to use in future years.

    Aside from a capital loss carryover you must claim capital gains and losses in the tax year when they are realized. There are some exceptions to this rule. For example, if the loss is due to a wash sale, in which case you may have to wait to claim a capital loss, or a constructive sale, in which case you may have to claim a capital gain even if you have not realized the gain yet.

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  • Don G
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If you can identify the specific shares of stock purchased and later sold, then each stock transaction identifies its gain or loss. No need to lump all shares bought or sold in a year.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No, you can't selectively decide to not use it this year in favor of a year when you might have to pay at a higher rate.

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