Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureMythology & Folklore · 1 month ago

Was king Arthur a celt? ?

I've been reading about the legendary King Arthur, of course its a myth but was it invented by the celtic people of the island of Britain known as Bretton or the invading saxons at the time.

Its a, source of confusion for me as he seems to be a British hero in modern depictions yet he allegedly fought the early modern day English settlers the saxons. It seems as though the saxons/Norman descendants are celebrating a hero who if we're to have exist would have been the enemy of their ancestors. Also whenever I see Arthur depicted he has a royal English accent, shouldn't he at least be given a Welsh, cornish or Scottish accent considering he's a celtic legend? I find it unusual considering in most viking depictions on screen they have a Danish accent. 

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  • 9 hours ago

    He was, that is why he has no ghost as his spirit became a tree.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    1st problem is when he lived. And 2nd is where. Celts were a huge loose confederation of tribes. Going from Scotland to the Mediterranean, from France/Spain to Romania. Some speculate King Arthur was from a area of France named Britanny. There is a interesting stones called the Carnac Stones. Which seem to be old as or older than StoneHenge. 

    Was Arthur a Celt possibly yes. Was he from the British Isle probably not. Probably a Gaul from modern day northern France area not far from Brittany

    Some stories travel with culture. The Celts have a long deep history that goes back very far. Yet they were a huge group over a vast area. So legends and hero's have tendencies to get some embellishments as time moves on.

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  • .....
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    I agree. Today many Irish (Ire-land = Israel=land), are Catholic, yet the catholic/ babylonian hierarchy are enemies of true followers of Jesus Christ, the Protestants (protesting the catholic system).

    GodsGrandPlan.org has a fantastic book titled "Communication With the Spirit World of God, It's Laws and Purpose" by Johannes Greber  - 1932 translated to English.

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  • 1 month ago

    No, he was a Briton.  Celts were a whole different tribe.

    It doesn't matter who invented him or what their lineage was.  Was Daffy Duck animated by a duck?  Darth Vader was voiced by an English black guy, but he's neither.  

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  • 1 month ago

    Many legends attribute him to actually being  Welsh, or from the Wales area. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes. The Battle of Badon was a battle purportedly fought between Celtic Britons and Anglo-Saxons in Britain in the late 5th or early 6th century. It was credited as a major victory for the Britons, stopping the encroachment of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms for a period. The earliest references to the battle date to the 6th century. It is chiefly known today for the supposed involvement of King Arthur, a tradition that first clearly appeared in the 9th-century Historia Brittonum, possibly written by Nennius. Because of the limited number of sources, there is no certainty about the date, location, or details of the fighting.

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  • j153e
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Some structures have been unearthed under the Tintagel site, and those earlier structures are apparently 5th and 6th century.  Another site also has some connection to Camelot, i.e. the ancient Roman fort Camulodunum, located in present day West Yorkshire town of Slack.  Some historical activity of some leader with military chops (no pun intended) may have begun the King Arthur story.

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  • 1 month ago

    He was probably Romano-Celtic, and certainly not a king!  He (assuming he even existed!) seems to have been a war leader who was acting against the Anglo-Saxons (later called English), not long after the Romans officially left Britain.  He likely would have spoken Latin, and Brythonic.  It appears he was from Wessex (south-west England), although some stories have him elsewhere.  It seems he was called the "Dux Belloran," or battle leader, and lead men into 13 successful battles, although he was killed in the last one.

    Now, a person at least semi-mythical who might have existed (as a hero) has had all sorts of things written about him, and, the stories have grown over the years.  E.g., the concept of Merlin, magic, and, and, and, .....  In all honesty, he was likely just a moderately successful warlord!  But, of such, legends are made.

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    He probably was.  I get amused/annoyed when people doing "period pieces"  (like Shakespeare) speak with RP accents, as if they come from Chigwell.  (The accent of most English people in the 16th century was closer to modern American or Irish accents.)  That whole "I'm taking a BAHTH" thing didn't occur until the late 19th century, nor did pronouncing "either" as "EYE-thur" until Albert came along.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I've always thought him Anglo.

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