Does sedation induces dementia ?

My grandma had covid 19 and was on the ventilator for 2 weeks, Hospital 6 weeks. Before this all happened. She lived a full life, able to go shopping, drive, memory pretty good for her age. However, she did have what I assume is called delusions. She would accuse my grandmother of having an affair(85 ur old who barely leaves the house) and she would accuse my adult cousin of destroying things in her house which are clearly a result of wear and tear...Now after being sedated and on a lot of meds, she still remembers things and knows most of the things we talk about but she will occasionally say something that is untrue or talk about someone who has been dead for years. Like today she said someone came to visit her which was untrue. We also have a hard time getting her to eat enough food and she is not sleeping. Finally, my question is can all that she went through trigger dementia? Could it be the fact that she’s not sleeping that’s causing her confusion? I know this is not the place to get professional answers but I’m hoping someone has advice? Her doctor seem to not know anything and not very helpful 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    My mother had a similar reaction after being placed on a ventilator.She has since recovered and we laugh about the ridiculous things she said. 

    My theory is even though you are unconscious you aren't sleeping. When you go without sleep for a long enough time you will start to hallucinate as if you were dreaming.  The line between reality and dreams is blurred because of the sedation and lack of sleep. If that's the case, she should eventually return to normal. Of course, there are other possibilities too

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  • 1 month ago

    Sounds like Alzheimer's

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  • 1 month ago

    Sedation and anesthesia work differently on a senior citizen than on a younger person. They can often experience dementia-like symptoms after coming out of either one. Your grandma had a serious horrible illness and will take time to recover. Don't worry about dementia just yet--give her time to FULLY recover. Her brain likely experienced some trauma during COVID, maybe swelling and inflammation--and that can cause such problems. 

    It takes time. Sometimes a long time. I can't believe her doctors don't know enough to tell you that. Most nurses could tell you something similar. Ask them instead. 

    And it's a blessing she recovered. 

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  • 1 month ago

    first off, I celebrate your grandma's recovery. 

    Please understand that 6 weeks of hospitalization and at least 2 weeks flat on your back on a ventilator is going to cause some serious problems that require rehabilitation, even for much younger patients.  Walking and talking is difficult because of being bed ridden and on a vent.

    First off, we don't know everything that this virus does to people and a recovery is amazing.  But as far as neuro damage goes, we do know that high fever and a lot of inflammation go along with it. 

    And I wonder if your grandmother could have also suffered a stroke during this time which would add to her confusion.  And her doctors haven't done any tests to rule this out.

    She might get better in time as she recovers.  But if not, your family should ask her doctor for a cat scan or an MRI to rule out a stroke.  And if this is dementia, there are medications that if given early on, could help. 

    I wish her all the best.

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  • 1 month ago

    Most likely the sedative drugs are making her act like that. Older people are especially sensitive to sedatives, and maybe they should decrease some of

    those medications.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    My wife had mild dementia and had to have surgery The doctor told us the sedation could make her dementia worst. I don't think it did but it was hard to tell.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I have had a few surgeries where I was sedated and noticed that after each one it seems that I have lost another little piece of my brain.  Since the last one, I never seem to know what day it is.  I am always checking my phone or the calendar to find out.  

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Grandmother beat the odds and survived the coronavirus.  Of course she's going to have memory problems if she was sedated while on a ventilator.  Give her time to adjust to her surroundings.

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  • 1 month ago

    How old is your grandma? Fevers produce delirium and hallucinations. Yes, disease can trigger dementia, especially through the liver. That's usually temporary though.

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  • 1 month ago

    I imagine the she had the startings of dementia and the whole ordeal brought it to the surface.  You should probably contact an Alzheimer specialist and get her seen to determine more.  

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