What are my chances of getting into medical school with only a 3.3 GPA?

While my GPA may not be the greatest, there has been an upward trend since an overall rough freshman year. Some things that I believe benefit me are that I received high grades in physiology, physiology lab, biochemistry, genetics, and human anatomy. Additionally, I received a 514 on the MCAT, putting me at the 92 percentile. I have been involved in undergraduate research during my entire tenure of undergrad, with a specific focus on biomolecular research regarding the regulation of human metabolic pathways and their deficiencies, and my research PI, who wrote one of my letters of recommendation at one point chaired on a department of the ACS. I have extensive volunteering experience at a local hospital, am currently employed in the healthcare field as a CNA, am involved in extracurriculars associated with my major, am a member of my universities honors college, am part of my universities STEM associated residential college, and I am a dual degree candidate with a major completely unrelated to STEM, which according to my uncle, who is a specialized physician, could be to my advantage, as it shows I offer a new perspective towards medical school. If it counts for anything, I am a certified bilingual, having taken an internationally recognized fluency exam. Some of my weak points are, as I mentioned, having a low GPA, performing poorly in general and organic chemistry, and taking my physics classes outside of my university. What are my chances with respect to my pros and cons? 

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  • MS
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It truly depends on the medical schools to which you apply.  Your MCAT scores and research experience will help you considerably, as will a high science GPA (which you seem to indicate you have).  However, your overall GPA is somewhat low for medical school and may prevent your application from passing even the first initial review at some schools. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Med school admissions are far more competitive than in your uncle's day. Many require minimum 3.75/3.85 GPA to apply. MCAT score is good, but almost all accepted into med schools score 95%ile or better. Unless your research has garnered awards, publication, national recognition, it probably is not enough to save you. Working as a CNA - about the lowest level there is - is not a real asset, unless you want to get into a program from bachelor's degree to BSN in nursing.

    Your GPA is too low to have any reasonable chance of admission to med school, dental school, pharmacy school, etc. You could look at bachelor's to BSN programs for nursing & have some chance at that. Plus you have some experience in direct patient care, despite the low level of CNA qualification.

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  • John
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    I'm afraid your GPA is very low by medical school standards.  Medical schools tend to look primarily at ones GPA and MCAT scores. Perhaps part of your GPA difficulties come from spreading yourself too thin.  Pursuing an unrelated degree and working (you don't mention how many hours per week) may have diluted your time for pre-med studies.   

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  • 2 months ago

    if you are doing all of this while working full time as a CNA, you'll likely be awarded extra 'points' toward admission. be aware that virtually all medical schools are highly selective and thus you need to apply to several or even as many as ten

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  • 2 months ago

    Why would you want to be a doctor? 

    That profession takes advantage of everyone, left and right. 

    ...and is actually designed to kill people.  Think about it. 

    Medical Schools only spend a week 

    on nutrition and preventative medicine. 

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