What electronics component is this?

Update:

The one the pen is pointing to!

Update 2:

It's on a electric piano circuit board for midi (midi out isn't working).

Attachment image

8 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    As others have said, it's an RF choke, used to block parasitic RF. This component can't fail (unless there's a dry solder joint)

  • M.
    Lv 7
    5 days ago

    It looks like 2 ferrite beads.  Inductors.  Chokes.

  • 3 weeks ago

    THIS IS A RF CHOKE TO BE USED TO BLOCK UNWANTED SPIKES.

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  • qrk
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Looks like two ferrite beads strung in series.

    • derfram
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      Looks like ferrite beads to me too. 

  • 3 weeks ago

    what I see is part of a printed circuit board with a metal piece attached, which has two holes in it. The PC board has a transistor on the left, several resistors, several strange black components, and what appears to be a metal piece, perhaps a transformer. 

    the black components are a bit blurry.... except for the wires soldered to the top, they could be capacitors. 

    re other answers, yes, I see now that they are ferrite beads. large ones. 

  • 3 weeks ago

    I see several, a transistor, a couple 1/4 watt resistors, and what looks to be a pen, pointing to ferrite chokes. a heavy loop of solid wire for current, with ferrite beads to make a low inductance choke.

    (power supply circuit perhaps)

  • 3 weeks ago

    That's weird I'm not sure!

    - If 3 wires on their bottom they are transistors. Transistors are sometimes 'jumped'.

    - If 2 wire, my best guess is they are capacitors, especially since I think I see a "-" sign and capacitors are directional (and resistors are not).

    But I gotta say, I've never seen a jumper quite like that!!!

    Attachment image
    • Bruce H3 weeks agoReport

      Would capacitors be joined like that?  

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