Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Family & RelationshipsFamily · 9 months ago

Is there a way to speak with the school about this child disrupting my daughter's learning without seeming offensive in any way?

My 8 year old daughter has a classmate who has angry outbursts to the extreme. She throws objects at people, yells at teachers, runs away and throws hourly tantrums. The list goes on. I'm aware that this girl might have a diagnosis of ODD, bipolar or another mood/brain disorder that causes behavioural issues. The teacher has to devote her extra attention to this child which takes away time for learning. When the kids are actually learning, the child could disrupt the moment any time. She is scaring other children with those violent tantrums. The teacher normally calls the principal and they'll restrain her if she gets physical. There's a special ed teacher but she's not always in the class. I don't think the girl is doing well in a typical classroom. There are alternative school programs available for kids like her, who cannot function in a "normal" environment. It's making other kids uncomfortable and they're missing out on the lessons.

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  • 9 months ago

    you could try talking to the principal about it

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  • 9 months ago

    I would say exactly what you said to us, to the principal.

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  • 9 months ago

    As a parent, your main concern is for the safety and progress of your child, and you do need to have some serious discussions with the school principle about the fact that your child's education is being disrupted. You actually need not concern yourself with the other poor child in the class even if you know and care about them. I suggest also that you teach your daughter some self defence skill; a martial arts class, for example, or even some ideas off Youtube. Try: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8BVx2S6IMo

    Youtube thumbnail

    .

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  • 9 months ago

    I get that this is an experiment and everyone is hoping that this gal can figure out how to remain in school. And I understand it can be challenging for the other students and the teacher. but that the kids are "missing out on the lessons"? I think that's bs. They just don't like her. Too bad. The school and her folks will figure it out... they're just hoping that she'll learn to assimilate. Doesn't seem to be happening. You complaining that your daughter's education is hampered? Are you seriously thinking that is true? Has this been the 3rd year in a row or something? Or just the 2nd month? Relax about it. They'll figure it out and it's not contagious. Many of these kids are exceptionally bright and find school incredibly boring. But the school will figure it out. You don't know what "kids like her" actually are. Those programs might be for kids who will never learn to read, not for kids too smart to even be there. You don't know her situation. Just that your daughter is uncomfortable. She can still do her homework and learn her lessons. And this other gal? Unlikely to be there more than another year or two before everyone figures out a better choice.

    Missing out on lessons? I remember 3rd grade. Wasn't hard to keep up with!

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  • Mark
    Lv 5
    9 months ago

    Talk to the parents. Find out their side of the story. Without resorting to any blame, shame or judgement, start off by complimenting them on having such a passionate child who expresses her emotions so clearly! By keeping it positive, you avoid a fight. Now, you may think that's no a great way to resolve this, but I'd bet my bottom dollar, they are more than aware of the struggles, violence, tantrums, etc. - which can also be from undiagnosed/treated autism (yes, girls get it too, not just boys) and the child cannot cope with the stimulus overload. B

    By getting onside with them first, you stand a greater chance of being heard by them. Another possibility is it comes from a violent home/family background. Less likely, but still...

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    You describe perfectly the way Pearl L. acted in school and if she don't get her way she acts that way now.

    I would speak with the school or cps.

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  • MARIAN
    Lv 4
    9 months ago

    I can only imagine what those children have to experience & it's not fair at all! I recommend contacting the school board to make them aware. I'm sure the principal is trying something but it's not working. Ask that your name not be mentioned but definitely visit school board!

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