Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationMotorcycles · 9 months ago

I noticed motorcycles don't have a fuel gauge (Harleys), only the speed meter and miles counter, how do riders know how much fuel is left?

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  • adam
    Lv 4
    6 months ago

    All newer HD have a fuel gauge. Your a moron. Take the bus.  Only a complete idiot would run out of gas even without a gas gauge.

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  • 9 months ago

    Riders use their head when judging fuel per distance. Also you can just stop and look in the tank. Two sided tanks have a reserve/main/stop selection on the tank petcock so when one side runs out, they switch the valve to the other side and find a gas station.

  • 9 months ago

    Knowing that my gas mileage dropped from 50mpg to 45 due to modifications means I don't really need that gas gauge or low fuel light on my '06 HD.

    On my earlier bikes, knowing my mpg allowed me to use the odometer or trip meter.

    I never liked running on reserve.

    Then, there's always the sometimes preferred alternative - fuel often, even if not needed right now.

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  • 9 months ago

    Most riders know, this many miles on a full tank. Than fuel-time.

    My Triumph Tiger 955i has a 6.2 gal. tank so at app. 50 MPG around 250+ miles depending on my right wrist LOL!

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  • Ron
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    I don't know how much fuel is left until I fill it up again. I do know approximately how far I can go before I get the urge to fill it up. It's called, paying attention to the odometer

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  • JetDoc
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Newer bikes with fuel injection will at least have a warning light to let the rider know he's getting low on fuel. Older bikes with carburetors have a two position fuel petcock that allows a "reserve" amount of fuel in the tank. When the tank drops below the reserve, the engine stumbles and stops. The rider then switches to the reserve tank and can ride for a few more miles to get to a gas station and fill the tank again. Also, experienced riders should know how many miles their bike will go on a tank of gas. They use the odometer (miles counter) to keep track.

    Source(s): More than 50 years of motorcycle riding experience and still around to talk about it.
    • P & W9 months agoReport

      Many older carbed bikes had a gauge and/or indicator light, too.

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  • 9 months ago

    Look Closer. All Harleys made after '07. I know, have one. It is either on the nacelle, in the fairing, or that thing on the left that looks like a fuel cap, but big label: "Do Not twist--Not a fuel cap". They also have a below 1/4 tank orange warning lite on speedo. Some Sportys had a LED bargraph gauge you simply did not Recognize. All Feulies do, too, as they don't have a fuel tap with reserve.

    My '83 Honda has a digital bar graph gauge. If you don't have one, fill up, reset trip meter. ride until you have to turn on Reserve. Then, note the miles. If it is ,say 140, then get gas at 110 or so. Or carry a quart of gas in an old oil bottle.

    On some you can just look down or use a stick. Some, any splashing means a pint or more left. Some, you really can't see if any gas in. My Honda, even if you hear splashing, that could be fuel trapped on right side, which is prevented by the big frame well from getting to the L side where tap is.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    If they don't have a fuel gauge, bikes have a reserve tap so, after filling up the bike, zero the trip meter. You can use this method to predict when the fuel level is low and determine the distance you can cover per gallon of petrol (gas).

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    • Lv 5
      9 months agoReport

      Exactly. I thought that was silly advice. I had a 1980 CB650Z and used the method above. I could accurately predict when it would go on reserve which was at the 130 miles mark, so would stop at 120 and refill the tank or put enough in to get home having worked out that the bike returned 43mph.

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  • Tim D
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    The miles counter (odometer) tells you how far you have gone. On my XT600 once I have gone 90 miles I know that I need to refill (and keep a shortish range in hand to reach the next fuel station, there is a reserve position on the petcock).

    Many bikes have a trip on a secondary odometer.

  • 9 months ago

    By feel of the motorcycle. sometimes at a stop they shake the cycle and can hear it slosh around the tank.

    • P & W9 months agoReport

      Sloshing doesn't necessarily mean any usable gas. I can have a pint trapped on R side of my Honda's tank, but that gas cant get to the L side where tap is. I always need at least a pint on L side to prevent loss of syphon.

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