Sudheer asked in EnvironmentGlobal Warming · 1 decade ago

what can a normal person do in his immediate household to help combat climate change?

12 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Turn the heat up when it gets colder outside.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Use energy efficient appliances.

    Replace incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescents

    Buy a high-efficiency model with a power consumption of less than 0.9 kWh/washing cycle, and wash with full loads and cool loads when possible. Hang your clothes out on the line when the weather permits.

    Buy a laptop instead of a desktop, if practical. It consumes five times less electricity.

    A power strip is also a practical way to switch off VCR, TV and DVD-player stand-by losses

    Use a water-saving shower head, and take shorter, cooler showers.

    Walk or ride a bike when possible, and use public transit or carpool.

    When you drive, avoid harsh acceleration and unnecessary braking. Better for your car, too.

    Turn down the heat. Even a 2 degree saving will add up, and save you money.

    Lots more, too, but you get the idea. One person, one family, can make a huge different, and sets a great example for family and friends. And if you want to help with your pocketbook, support an organization that is working to change the way we do business so we have a better world.

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  • 1 decade ago

    For a new house, building design; details will depend on where you live. For an older house, loft insulation, well fitting doors and windows, fans to cut down on air conditioning, that sort of thing.

    Dress warmly in winter and turn the heating down. Don't heat or cool rooms that you're not actually using.

    Walk or cycle more, use the car less, use public transport, and if possible take the train rather than flying.

    Choose a car with good fuel consumption, and gently on the pedals.

    Cut down on sheer waste, especially if you are now throwing out food. See where your food came from and cut down on its travel miles.

    Aim to avoid bottled water unless the stuff is really inadequate where you live. If tapwater just doesn't taste very nice, get a charcoal filter jug.

    This way, not only do you cut down on your personal contribution to climate change, but you get more money and better health.

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  • SaveB
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    I'm sorry to contadict previous answers, but it completely wrong that to make your house greener you have to spend a lot of money in it. This is just a small share of the whole picture, even if it's the one that people giving LEED certificates prefer. Greener houses correspond mainly to SAVING MONEY.

    Let me give you just some examples.

    WINDOWS: When you see an "environmental friendly house", you usually see large windows, entire walls made of glass. And LEED certificates, for example, give you extra points if you make these windows "energy efficient" with double layers, fancy gases in the between, etc...

    However, this idea is wrong, and comes from the fact that green OFFICES are designed to have large windows because they save money in this way, because people stay in the office during the day when the sun shine, so you need less lighting in the interior if windows are large. However, the main energy consumption in houses is HEATING. And it is not even comparable the thermal insulation of a brick wall with the thermal insulation of fancy expensive argon filled windows!

    For this reason, apartments consume way less energy in heating than environmental friendly houses in the middle of a wood! Do you know that the energy consumption of Manhattans is the lowest in the whole US? Both for households and for transportation! The gas that every Manhattan uses for transportation corresponds to what an AVERAGE American used to use in the 30s!

    Another quick example. In Europe nobody has a dryer at home. We all use "solar powered dryers" :) That is, we hang our clothes outside! However, for some reason, in Southern California, where the sun shine 360 days per year, everybody has a dryer. Stop using your dryer and you will save both money and the environment.

    When tall skyscrapers in the financial district are defined as "green" because they have solar panel on their walls, this is just advertising. They are indeed "green" because:

    - 95% percent of the people going there are forced to move with public transportation and elevators -- no cars

    - the shape of the building (small room/volume ratio compare for example to supermarkets) make their heating/cooling system highly energy efficient.

    I strongly suggest you the following book about this.

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  • 1 decade ago

    well you as an individual cant really do anything, just try and set the trend for others :) the more people that follow you the better off everyone is in the long run,

    essentially what you need to know is to make your house 'green' it is extremely expensive in the short run, but cheaper in the long run. what you need to do is make your house self sufficient. meaning: have stuff like solar panels powering your entire house, get a water tank that captures rain water to be used for watering gardens and cleaning the house, start growing your own organic vegetables. I've seen some houses that are completely self efficient and don't require anything from anywhere... stuff like that is extremely expensive though and will only save you money after about 10-15 years

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  • 1 decade ago

    You can do a lot of things, like to avoid using old car that emits dark and to much carbon dioxide, to avoid to much use of aerosol, to avoid burning rubbers especially tires and many more. In doing so, you contribute a lot in a little way to combat climate change.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Make changes that save you money and you'll be fine. Changes that won't cost much money include using only lights you need, taking short showers, turning the thermostat up in the summer and down in the winter, and setting your water heater at 120 degrees or lower.

    Many other changes require money - which is one way to invest your savings!

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  • Mike
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Dann mentions some great things to do to make your house self sufficient, but not only is it too cost prohibitive for most people, as it relates to Global Warming it won't make any difference whatsoever. I don't care if everyone on the planet did it. One good volcano eruption probably spews out more crap in a month than humans can in 30 years.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I do not believe in AGW, but if you did less consumption will greatly reduce your footprint. I have reduced my consumption, (energy, goods) more to reduce my spending.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    all of us have to start doing it. If all of us are able to use latest technology called ShwaasPathy and start breathing that way then this problem can be reduced considerably

    Source(s): International Conference on Climate Change Vigyan Bhawan Delhi
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