Isn't this the kind of guy the UK needs? Bet we'd get "Diversity" representing us - how diverse are 6 blacks?!?

Backgrounder: Marko Perkovic Croatian-based singer Marko Perkovic (who is also called Thompson) and his band Thompson are known for singing nationalistic songs about Croatia and publicly supporting the Ustashe, a fascist, pro-Nazi regime in Croatia responsible for murdering tens of thousands of Jews, Serbs, and... show more Backgrounder: Marko Perkovic

Croatian-based singer Marko Perkovic (who is also called Thompson) and his band Thompson are known for singing nationalistic songs about Croatia and publicly supporting the Ustashe, a fascist, pro-Nazi regime in Croatia responsible for murdering tens of thousands of Jews, Serbs, and Roma from 1941-1945.

Various media accounts report that Thompson’s concerts in Europe begin with the traditional “war cry” of the Ustashe. Concertgoers, comprised mostly of young people, many wearing black shirts with Ustashe insignia and carrying banners with anti-Serb and anti-Roma rhetoric, often respond with Nazi salutes. Ustashe paraphernalia is allegedly sold at the concerts, as well.

At his concerts, Thompson also reportedly plays a song that relates the killing of Serbs at the Jasenovac death camp, where tens of thousands of people were killed by the Ustashe during World War II.

Perkovic’s Appearances: A Record of Nazi Symbols and Salutes

At a June 2007 concert in Zagreb, Perkovic reportedly opened his act by shouting a traditional Ustashe slogan, which was met with Nazi salutes from fans. The concert, attended by over 40,000 people, was aired on state-owned television.

In November 2003, a Thompson concert scheduled in Amsterdam was cancelled amidst accusations of Perkovic giving the Nazi salute at previous concerts and his band’s alleged sympathy with Nazi “ideas.” The concert was relocated to Rotterdam, but Perkovic himself was banned from singing. In responding to the cancellation, Perkovic allegedly told a Croatian newspaper, “It is all to blame on the Jews. I have nothing against them and I did nothing to them. I know that Jesus Christ also did nothing against them, but still they hanged him on the cross. So what can I expect as a small man?”

Also, in September 2003, Thompson reportedly performed at a Croatian soccer stadium and gave Nazi salutes. In addition, in August 2003, Thompson organized a public demonstration to honor the Ustashe in Slavonski Brod, a Croatian town.

According to media reports, at a reception at the Croatian capitol honoring the national handball team in February 2003, Perkovic allegedly shouted a slogan used by Croatian Nazis in World War II, prompting dozens in the crowd to give a Nazi salute. Then, Prime Minister Ivica Racan condemned the use of Nazi slogans and salutes at that event.

Perkovic Denies Supporting Concentration Camp Atrocities

On the Web site of Thompson’s representative, Syndicate Productions, Perkovic claims that his songs are “about God, family and the homeland.” He states that “the worst of all false accusations flung” at him is that he wrote and performs a song commemorating the atrocities at the Jasenovac concentration camp during World War II. Perkovic denies writing or performing the song and states that he is a musician, not a politician.

Response to Thompson’s Concerts by the Jewish and Serbian Community

Representatives of the American and international Jewish community, as well as the Serbian community, have spoken out against Thompson/Perkovic. Croatian Jewish groups have come together to oppose Perkovic’s appearances, especially when Croatian authorities did not condemn Perkovic’s June 2007 concert, which attracted thousands of fans, including members of the Croatian parliament.

In November 2007, Perkovic and his band scheduled several concerts in cities throughout the United States and Canada, including New York, Cleveland, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Jose, Toronto, and Vancouver.

On November 2 and 3, 2007, Perkovic and his band played in New York City. There were no reports of pro-Ustashe symbols or Nazi salutes at those concerts. Although two venues in Toronto cancelled Perkovic’s scheduled concert there, he did play in a city outside of Toronto on November 4. According to The Star, a Canadian paper, fans were asked not to bring Ustashe memorabilia to that concert.








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Update: Rikstir, the question would be "IS IT NOW TIME FOR UK NATIONALISTS TO STAND UP AND BE COUNTED TOO?"
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