Which of these two statements is grammatically correct?

1) I wish you were here holding me tight against you, telling me you loved me. 2) I wish you were here holding me tight against you, telling me you love me. The word we are looking at here is "love" or "loved". I personally think that both are grammatically correct, but wanted a couple of... show more 1) I wish you were here holding me tight against you, telling me you loved me.

2) I wish you were here holding me tight against you, telling me you love me.

The word we are looking at here is "love" or "loved". I personally think that both are grammatically correct, but wanted a couple of different opinions.

For a simple "test" I typed both sentences into Microsoft Word and there was no "grammatical error" underlining (hope you know what I mean by the underlining, I can't think of any other way to explain it!).

Cheers for any feedback :-D
Update: john n and some others - The reason the first sentence uses "love" in a past tense is because the sentence is wishful thinking and therefore hypothetical. "I wish you WERE here". Were is past tense, and as butterfly explained, "Generally, the tenses should be consistent throughout the... show more john n and some others - The reason the first sentence uses "love" in a past tense is because the sentence is wishful thinking and therefore hypothetical. "I wish you WERE here". Were is past tense, and as butterfly explained, "Generally, the tenses should be consistent throughout the text". This doesn't stop the term "love" being used in present tense from also being grammatically correct (I have come to these conclusions after reading through the answers)

anarkali appears to have a half-decent argument, her posts did kinda confuse me. I'm not stupid, but also not an English teacher, so the post including many phrases such as "Imaginative conditional sentences " kinda threw me off.

She also contradicts herself with "I believe the second one is correct" yet posts information that says "Hypothetical events or states are unlikely but possible in the present or future". Option 2 is surely a hypothetical event in the present?

Some very good contributions, thanks.
Update 2: An addition to my first paragraph of additional information (hope that makes sense lol).

This therefore means that the first sentence is not declaring past love, it is simply staying with the same tense throughout the sentence.
Update 3: Sorry, more additional info lol. Anarkli states "Hypothetical events or states are unlikely but possible in the present or future." Surely this proves that both statements are correct? Number 1. is correct as a general rule, and number 2. fits into the "unlikely but possible" category, and... show more Sorry, more additional info lol. Anarkli states "Hypothetical events or states are unlikely but possible in the present or future."

Surely this proves that both statements are correct? Number 1. is correct as a general rule, and number 2. fits into the "unlikely but possible" category, and therefore also correct.

Now, if only I knew how to close the topic and choose a best answer..... :-s (New guy) lol
13 answers 13