• Which is better, ( in your opinion). AH-64 apache guardian or kamov K-52 alligator/k-50 black shark?

    Best answer: AH-64 apache guardian (made in America)
    Best answer: AH-64 apache guardian (made in America)
    7 answers · 3 days ago
  • Can I become a professional pilot at 40?

    Best answer: Can you become a professional pilot at 40? Yes, if you can afford the $60,000+ in training fees.

    Are you likely to ever become a pilot for a major airline? No

    Do companies cover the cost of obtaining the required licenses? No
    Best answer: Can you become a professional pilot at 40? Yes, if you can afford the $60,000+ in training fees.

    Are you likely to ever become a pilot for a major airline? No

    Do companies cover the cost of obtaining the required licenses? No
    4 answers · 2 days ago
  • What should i do for my pilot training next ? [DGCA/EASA]?

    I'm currently in second year of Aircraft Maintenance Engineering (with a Bsc. Degree as well). I always wanted to be a pilot. But it was recommended to me that a degree would be better before pilot training and hence i chose Bsc. in Aircraft Maintenance. The course also has 3 licenses [Cat A, B1, B2] and... show more
    I'm currently in second year of Aircraft Maintenance Engineering (with a Bsc. Degree as well). I always wanted to be a pilot. But it was recommended to me that a degree would be better before pilot training and hence i chose Bsc. in Aircraft Maintenance. The course also has 3 licenses [Cat A, B1, B2] and i'm unsure which one will help me with my pilot training. I'm actually interested in B2 (Avionics) but to get this license i need 5 years of practical experience and the thing is, i don't want to delay my Pilot training by 5 years. I'll be getting my degree as soon as the course completes but my license takes too long. I'm really confused as to what to do now. My civil authority is DGCA and now my college is also offering EASA exams so i have a choice to do that too. Now, in your opinion, what do you recommend me to do ? You can also mail me if you want further information!
    4 answers · 2 days ago
  • Will blimps for commercial air travel ever make a comeback?

    Best answer: I Hope so. Rather, Dirigibles, much safer. After all, many look forward to a cruise and . a ship barely makes 20 knots whereas a gasbag makes 60. And can land anywhere if a storm. A ship must ride it out. EDIT: Poster said commercial, not: "Mass transport" or everyday use. . Commercial is paid to fly... show more
    Best answer: I Hope so. Rather, Dirigibles, much safer. After all, many look forward to a cruise and . a ship barely makes 20 knots whereas a gasbag makes 60. And can land anywhere if a storm. A ship must ride it out.

    EDIT: Poster said commercial, not: "Mass transport" or everyday use. . Commercial is paid to fly you. "Mass Transport" or whatever, is, I guess, a lot of people. Poster did not imply they would replace planes, fly every day, or even be in serious competition with them.

    Apples and oranges.
    19 answers · 1 week ago
  • Is there a shortage of airline pilots in the us and worldwide?

    Best answer: Yes, there has been a shortage of pilots for the past few years now. The regional airlines cannot find enough pilots to fly their equipment, because most people cannot afford to become airline pilots... which can be more expensive than becoming doctors. And even if they can afford it, most aren't willing to... show more
    Best answer: Yes, there has been a shortage of pilots for the past few years now. The regional airlines cannot find enough pilots to fly their equipment, because most people cannot afford to become airline pilots... which can be more expensive than becoming doctors. And even if they can afford it, most aren't willing to accept the entry level slave wages. Entry level co-pilots should be earning $60,000 a year, not a penny less. You needn't worry, airplanes aren't going away. What will happen is the regional airlines will disappear... maybe three or four operators will be left, consolidating all the regional market routes. Or, they will be bought up and run by their major airline "parents", who can easily pay pilots what they are worth.
    8 answers · 1 week ago
  • Under US law, would someone flying aircraft for a police department need to have a commercial pilot's license?

    Best answer: Yes. If one is paid to fly they are required to hold a Commercial Pilots Certificate. No, the type of aircraft flown doesn't make a difference, except that the employer or insurer of the aircraft can impose additional license or experience requirements in addition to the legal minimum requirements. That is... show more
    Best answer: Yes. If one is paid to fly they are required to hold a Commercial Pilots Certificate. No, the type of aircraft flown doesn't make a difference, except that the employer or insurer of the aircraft can impose additional license or experience requirements in addition to the legal minimum requirements. That is usually the case with police helicopter jobs. The applicant typically needs a lot more flight experience than is required to hold a CPL.
    8 answers · 1 week ago
  • What kind of degree do Airlines want to see on a resume?

    Best answer: "I have been told they just want something that is in the realm of aviation" FALSE. Any major will suffice, so long as the degree earned comes from an accredited institution. The major airlines actually prefer diversity in their employees, not cookie cutter clones who have all studied the same thing.... show more
    Best answer: "I have been told they just want something that is in the realm of aviation"

    FALSE. Any major will suffice, so long as the degree earned comes from an accredited institution. The major airlines actually prefer diversity in their employees, not cookie cutter clones who have all studied the same thing. What any degree shows is that you've met a minimum academic standard, that you're probably trainable, that you probably have some study skills, that you have some social skills, and that you are probably disciplined enough to endure a rigid and challenging program of study without quitting. In other words, it demonstrates qualities that show that you have a reasonable chance of getting through their training program.
    7 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Can we fly them over the country as transport?

    Best answer: There were some business people who flew old F-86 Sabre jets as private planes. Just be aware that upkeep on a fighter type plane is very, very expensive and they drink fuel like crazy. Eventually the people who owned Sabres got rid of them as the upkeep and fuel cost was stupid high. And Russian planes are even... show more
    Best answer: There were some business people who flew old F-86 Sabre jets as private planes. Just be aware that upkeep on a fighter type plane is very, very expensive and they drink fuel like crazy. Eventually the people who owned Sabres got rid of them as the upkeep and fuel cost was stupid high. And Russian planes are even thirstier and getting spare parts is a nightmare.
    5 answers · 7 days ago
  • Say if you want to be a pilot and you want to get a hands-on experience of what the occupation feels like, what should you do?

    I just got introduced to a type of learning called experiential learning.
    I just got introduced to a type of learning called experiential learning.
    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • Why do planes stall?

    14 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How do combat jets find their targets?

    Best answer: They use a combination of intelligence reports and sensors. Intel can be from a variety of sources like PM mentions. If it's a true fighter aircraft like an F-15C, the "targets" will only be enemy aircraft. The pilot will probably get help from an AWACS aircraft, which is an airborne command post... show more
    Best answer: They use a combination of intelligence reports and sensors. Intel can be from a variety of sources like PM mentions. If it's a true fighter aircraft like an F-15C, the "targets" will only be enemy aircraft. The pilot will probably get help from an AWACS aircraft, which is an airborne command post with a huge, long range radar that can see anything within 200 miles. AWACS tells pilot where the bad guys are, pilot confirms when he sees them on his own radar. From there he can slave his missiles to a specific target when he has a radar lock on it.

    For targets on the ground, bomber and attack aircraft crews are probably going to know where those targets are during briefing, before they even take off. They will have the target coordinates loaded into the aircraft's computers. They also get ground radio support from JTAC or airborne support from JSTARS, who have their eyes on the target. As far as sensors go, some aircraft like the F-35 have ground imaging radar that can identify a target, though most ground attack aircraft like the A-10c have a Litening pod, which is basically a high powered camera to literally see the target. Sometimes a target will be "lased" by someone on the ground... pointing a laser on the target, then the Litening pod picks up the laser spot.
    6 answers · 1 week ago
  • Good forums to ask Pilot questions?

    I'm taking a gap year right now and was thinking of being a Pilot for my career. So I have a bunch of questions and want real answers don't get me wrong Yahoo is great but there are a lot of trolls here in 2018
    I'm taking a gap year right now and was thinking of being a Pilot for my career. So I have a bunch of questions and want real answers don't get me wrong Yahoo is great but there are a lot of trolls here in 2018
    5 answers · 1 week ago
  • Can modern light planes such as the SR-22 and Diamond DA-40 fly upside down unlike classic Cessnas?

    Best answer: You mean "classic Cessnas" like the C150 and C152 Aerobats? They were not capable of sustained inverted flight, but unlike the SR-22 and DA-40, they WERE approved for basic aerobatics, like loops and rolls, that would put the ground over your head and the wheels reaching for the sky. None of... show more
    Best answer: You mean "classic Cessnas" like the C150 and C152 Aerobats? They were not capable of sustained inverted flight, but unlike the SR-22 and DA-40, they WERE approved for basic aerobatics, like loops and rolls, that would put the ground over your head and the wheels reaching for the sky.

    None of these aircraft have fuel or oil systems designed for sustained inverted flight. "Modern" has nothing to due with it. If a plane is not going to be used for aerobatics, you do not add the weight and costs of a beefed up air-frame and inverted fuel and oil systems.

    To be approved for any aerobatics other than spins, planes have to have greater design load factors, at least +6 G and -3 G, and must have quick release doors and seats that allow the occupants to be wearing a parachute.

    Even a standard C150/C152 or a C172, with no one seated in the back seat, is certified in the Utility category, which requires G limits of at least +4.4 to –1.76, and they are approved for spins.

    The SR-22 and DA-40 are certificated in the Normal category. with limits of +3.8 to –1.52 G, and are not certified for any aerobatics.
    5 answers · 1 week ago
  • Why do airplanes these days still need runways?

    Best answer: It goes like this. A civilian aircraft (ANY airliner) has, by law, to be capable of safe flight at maximum weight with one engine not operating. In the case of, say, a Boeing 777-300ER (maximum takeoff weight 775000 lb / 351533 kg)_ this means that one engine GE90-115 of 115300 lb thrust is capable of putting it in... show more
    Best answer: It goes like this.
    A civilian aircraft (ANY airliner) has, by law, to be capable of safe flight at maximum weight with one engine not operating.
    In the case of, say, a Boeing 777-300ER (maximum takeoff weight 775000 lb / 351533 kg)_ this means that one engine GE90-115 of 115300 lb thrust is capable of putting it in the air, if the runway is long enough.
    115300 / 775000 = 0.14877
    That is because the thrust of the engine is meant to overcome drag, while the lift is provided by the wings (and wings provide 15 to 20 pounds of lift for every pound of drag).

    But if you want to take off vertically, you need your "lift" (provided by engines) to at least equal the weight of the airplane.
    Which means the 777 described above would require engines about 7 times more powerful.
    Moreover, while an aircraft can fly horizontally with an asymmetric thrust (using aileron and rudder to balance thrust on one side only), a vertical takeoff would need some sort of cross linking to avoid flipping to the side (which is why vertical takeoff jet aircraft have only one engine, since it is extremely difficult to balance two jet engines to provide the exact same thrust all the time. Lose the engine, and you lose the plane. The pilot has an ejection seat in the case of military; which is not something an airliner can afford to have).
    For vertical takeoff and landing, either you have one engine, or you have a pair that are cross linked (like on the V-22) something that can be done with propellers but not easily with turbofans that spin dozen of times faster, or you have a bunch of engines that are running at less than maximum power so that one failure can be compensated with others engines going higher in power.

    So, that is why we don't do it. Trust us, we aerospace engineers know about aircraft design, what can be done economically, and what shouldn't.
    14 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Where Are The Fuel Tanks Located On An Amphibious Aircraft?

    More specifically the Consolidated PBY Catalina. I cannot seem to find a decent diagram of the interior, or a source for this info. Help appreciated.
    More specifically the Consolidated PBY Catalina. I cannot seem to find a decent diagram of the interior, or a source for this info. Help appreciated.
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • How far can a british Sunderland fly?

    how is it compared to the american Flying Fortress?
    how is it compared to the american Flying Fortress?
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago