• Are American slang words like dude, bro, buddy used in Ireland?

    Can you use them? Isn t it disrespectful, or anything?
    Can you use them? Isn t it disrespectful, or anything?
    9 answers · Other - Ireland · 1 week ago
  • Why are Irish people so bloodthirsty?

    I don’t mind them fighting the British army as such as that’s what happens in war even though I’m a Loyalist, but I hate the fight that Irish people blow up innocent men, women and children on the mainland who have nothing to do with our political situation in Northern Ireland, why do Irish people have no problem... show more
    I don’t mind them fighting the British army as such as that’s what happens in war even though I’m a Loyalist, but I hate the fight that Irish people blow up innocent men, women and children on the mainland who have nothing to do with our political situation in Northern Ireland, why do Irish people have no problem killing innocent children?
    7 answers · Other - Ireland · 3 weeks ago
  • Irish slang? Please read?

    Best answer: Being from Dublin myself, these are some of the common ones: 1. Get up out of that Pronounced as 'gerrup ow da' - basically means 'stop doing that'. 2. I was scarlet Pronouned as 'I wa'scarleh' - basically means 'I was so embarrassed my face was red' 3. Come here to me / Come... show more
    Best answer: Being from Dublin myself, these are some of the common ones:

    1. Get up out of that
    Pronounced as 'gerrup ow da' - basically means 'stop doing that'.

    2. I was scarlet
    Pronouned as 'I wa'scarleh' - basically means 'I was so embarrassed my face was red'

    3. Come here to me / Come here until I tell you
    Pronounced as 'C'mere tuh me' or 'C'mere til I telya' - basically means 'listen to me 'cause I've something interesting to tell you' as in 'C'mere tuh me ... did ya hear what happened to Mary?'

    4. Acting the maggot
    Pronounced as 'Acting duh maggot' - basically means 'messing about or doing something stupid' as in 'Your ma told you sit down and stop acting the maggot!'.

    5. Spanner
    Pronounced as 'Spanner' - basically means 'idiot' as in 'He smacked himself in the face with his own shoe. What a spanner!'

    6. Your one
    Pronounced as 'yer wan' - basically means 'that woman / girl' as in 'OMG. Did you see what yer wan was wearing?'
    It can also be applied to older people as in 'Who? That auld (old) wan over der (there) ...'

    7. Gurrier (no real English word)
    Pronounced as 'gurry-yer' - basically applied to young / teenage guys in a derogatory sense as in 'Dat (that) little gurrier is after setting me (my) bins on fire!'.

    8. Puss
    Pronounced as 'puss' - basically a face but in a negative way as in 'She had a puss like a bulldog licking a nettle'

    9. Wreck the gaff
    Pronounced as 'wreck duh gaff' - basically means go mad or destroy the place as in 'Deco was off-his-face (drunk) and wrecked the gaff stumbling about'. It also is used as an exclamation now and then as in 'Ah you're not serious! WRECK - DUH - GAFF!'.

    10. I will, in my hole
    Pronounced quickly as 'I-will-in-me-hole' - basically means 'I won't' or 'I will, on my a$$' as in 'Can you meet me at 10pm? I will in me hole (no!)'.

    So that's probably enough for now! Enjoy ...
    6 answers · Other - Ireland · 4 weeks ago
  • I’m an American, but?

    My parents sent out a lot of paperwork, and now I have an Irish Passport. What does that mean?
    My parents sent out a lot of paperwork, and now I have an Irish Passport. What does that mean?
    11 answers · Other - Ireland · 1 month ago
  • An American visiting Ireland for the first time?

    I’m an American and I’ve also just gotten an Irish passport. I’m visiting Ireland for the first time pretty soon. Hotel and return ticket already bought. What happens when I arrive at Dublin Airport? Is there a separate line for people with Irish passports?
    I’m an American and I’ve also just gotten an Irish passport. I’m visiting Ireland for the first time pretty soon. Hotel and return ticket already bought. What happens when I arrive at Dublin Airport? Is there a separate line for people with Irish passports?
    4 answers · Other - Ireland · 1 month ago
  • Is it very dangerous to travel solo to Ireland as a woman?

    Best answer: You'll be fine. Lots of women travel through Ireland alone and have a great time.
    Best answer: You'll be fine. Lots of women travel through Ireland alone and have a great time.
    8 answers · Other - Ireland · 1 month ago
  • When’s the second best time of the year to visit Ireland?

    Best answer: Late Spring, like May, is lovely - if the weather is nice. Likewise the Autumn, again, if the weather cooperates.

    The issue is really the weather. The only thing predictable about it is that it's completely unpredictable.
    Best answer: Late Spring, like May, is lovely - if the weather is nice. Likewise the Autumn, again, if the weather cooperates.

    The issue is really the weather. The only thing predictable about it is that it's completely unpredictable.
    4 answers · Other - Ireland · 1 month ago
  • How does a tourist usually get around Scotland and Ireland?

    Best answer: You could join one of the various tour groups that go around either country, but the downside of this is you'd only get the highlights. You could take public transport to the cities and larger towns and stop in smaller places along the way, but you would be limited to where the bus/train goes, and when. Taxis... show more
    Best answer: You could join one of the various tour groups that go around either country, but the downside of this is you'd only get the highlights.

    You could take public transport to the cities and larger towns and stop in smaller places along the way, but you would be limited to where the bus/train goes, and when. Taxis are also possible, but more expensive.

    You could hire a car and drive from place to place, but there are certain considerations: first of all, car hire companies will not take on clients younger than a particular age (statistically younger drivers are a greater risk), you would need an international driver's licence, you would need to be comfortable driving a stick-shift car (automatics are few and far between and expensive), you would need to be able to handle driving on the left-hand side of the road with a right-hand drive car. You'd also need lots of money because fuel is not cheap - unless you can rent an electric or a hybrid model - and you would have to pay for parking in most urban locations. The upside of renting a car, however, is that you will be able to get to places that most tourists don't see, as long as you are prepared to leave the larger roads.

    You could cycle from place to place, but this could be a bit dangerous as there are not many dedicated cycle lanes throughout the country. You'd also need to be in pretty good physical condition for it.

    If you had lots of time, you could walk from place to place, but you'd be travelling light. But you would see places that most people wouldn't see.

    And yeah, Ireland is a separate republic. Not part of the UK at all.
    4 answers · Other - Ireland · 1 month ago
  • When is the best time to visit Ireland?

    Best answer: Personally I think May/June is the nicest time - long evenings, short nights. There's no particularly time when the weather is best, it can be anything at any time of the year.
    Best answer: Personally I think May/June is the nicest time - long evenings, short nights. There's no particularly time when the weather is best, it can be anything at any time of the year.
    9 answers · Other - Ireland · 2 months ago
  • Why do the Irish still whinge and hate the English but they all still want to move here? Why be so hypocritical?

    Best answer: Well, the population of the Republic of Ireland is just over 4 million, and to my knowledge most of them are still in Ireland, and likely to stay here, so what are YOU on about?

    Oh WAIT. You're a troll. On here trying to stir up upset.

    And in the light of that, your question is funny.
    Best answer: Well, the population of the Republic of Ireland is just over 4 million, and to my knowledge most of them are still in Ireland, and likely to stay here, so what are YOU on about?

    Oh WAIT. You're a troll. On here trying to stir up upset.

    And in the light of that, your question is funny.
    4 answers · Other - Ireland · 2 months ago
  • Is it a long way to Tipperary?

    7 answers · Other - Ireland · 2 months ago