• Would u accept metric system in USA. Meters, kilograms, celsius, liters.?

    Best answer: The Chinese did the smart thing. They changed the definitions of their traditional measurement units so that each would be some exactly multiple or very simple fraction of a metric unit. Like, the "liang" is 20 kg, no more no less. The US disadvantage is 150 years of industrialization using feet,... show more
    Best answer: The Chinese did the smart thing. They changed the definitions of their traditional measurement units so that each would be some exactly multiple or very simple fraction of a metric unit. Like, the "liang" is 20 kg, no more no less.

    The US disadvantage is 150 years of industrialization using feet, inches, miles, and pounds.
    12 answers · 2 days ago
  • How long would it take a body to decompose completely at zero degrees?

    Not a serial killer, just asking for a project.
    Not a serial killer, just asking for a project.
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is the statement that no true scientist is a creationist considered a no true Scotsman?

    Best answer: Have a go at this Partial list of scientists alive today who accept the biblical account of creation Note: Individuals on this list must possess a doctorate in a science-related field. Dr Paul Ackerman, Psychologist Dr E. Theo Agard, Medical Physics Dr James Allan, Geneticist Dr Steve Austin, Geologist Dr S.E.... show more
    Best answer: Have a go at this

    Partial list of scientists alive today who accept the biblical account of creation
    Note: Individuals on this list must possess a doctorate in a science-related field.

    Dr Paul Ackerman, Psychologist
    Dr E. Theo Agard, Medical Physics
    Dr James Allan, Geneticist
    Dr Steve Austin, Geologist
    Dr S.E. Aw, Biochemist
    Dr Thomas Barnes, Physicist
    Dr Geoff Barnard, Immunologist
    Dr Don Batten, Plant physiologist, tropical fruit expert
    Dr John Baumgardner, Electrical Engineering, Space Physicist, Geophysicist, expert in supercomputer modeling of plate tectonics
    Dr Jerry Bergman, Psychologist
    Dr Kimberly Berrine, Microbiology & Immunology
    Prof. Vladimir Betina, Microbiology, Biochemistry & Biology
    Dr Raymond G. Bohlin, Biologist
    Dr Markus Blietz, Astrophysicist
    Dr Andrew Bosanquet, Biology, Microbiology
    Edward A. Boudreaux, Theoretical Chemistry
    Dr David R. Boylan, Chemical Engineer
    Prof. Linn E. Carothers, Associate Professor of Statistics
    Dr Robert W. Carter, Zoology (Marine Biology and Genetics)
    Dr David Catchpoole, Plant Physiologist (read his testimony)
    Prof. Sung-Do Cha, Physics
    Dr Eugene F. Chaffin, Professor of Physics
    Dr Choong-Kuk Chang, Genetic Engineering
    Prof. Jeun-Sik Chang, Aeronautical Engineering
    Dr Donald Chittick, Physical Chemist
    Prof. Chung-Il Cho, Biology Education
    Dr John M. Cimbala, Mechanical Engineering
    Dr Harold Coffin, Palaeontologist
    Dr Bob Compton, DVM
    Dr Ken Cumming, Biologist
    Dr Jack W. Cuozzo, Dentist
    Dr William M. Curtis III, Th.D., Th.M., M.S., Aeronautics & Nuclear Physics
    Dr Malcolm Cutchins, Aerospace Engineering
    Dr Lionel Dahmer, Analytical Chemist
    Dr Raymond V. Damadian, M.D., Pioneer of magnetic resonance imaging
    Dr Chris Darnbrough, Biochemist
    Dr Nancy M. Darrall, Botany
    Dr Bryan Dawson, Mathematics
    Dr Douglas Dean, Biological Chemistry
    Prof. Stephen W. Deckard, Assistant Professor of Education
    Dr David A. DeWitt, Biology, Biochemistry, Neuroscience
    Dr Don DeYoung, Astronomy, atmospheric physics, M.Div
    Dr Geoff Downes, Creationist Plant Physiologist
    Dr Ted Driggers, Operations research
    Dr Angel Duty, Biomedical engineering
    Dr Chad Duty, Mechanical engineering
    Robert H. Eckel, Medical research
    Dr André Eggen, Geneticist
    Dr Deborah (Debbie) Eisenhut, Medical missionary with SIM
    Dr Edward Elmer, Orthopedic surgery specialist (Harvard Medical School graduate)
    Prof. Dennis L. Englin, Professor of Geophysics
    Prof. Danny Faulkner, Astronomy
    Prof. Carl B. Fliermans, Professor of Biology
    Prof. Dwain L. Ford, Organic Chemistry
    Prof. Robert H. Franks, Associate Professor of Biology
    Dr Alan Galbraith, Watershed Science
    Dr Paul Giem, Medical Research
    Dr Maciej Giertych, Geneticist
    Dr Tim Gilmour, Electrical Engineer
    Dr Duane Gish, Biochemist
    Dr Werner Gitt, Information Scientist
    Dr D.B. Gower, Biochemistry
    Dr Dianne Grocott, Psychiatrist
    Dr Stephen Grocott, Industrial Chemist
    Dr Donald Hamann, Food Scientist
    Dr Barry Harker, Philosopher
    Dr Charles W. Harrison, Applied Physicist, Electromagnetics
    Dr John Hartnett, Physicist and Cosmologist
    Dr Mark Harwood, Satellite Communications
    Dr Joe Havel, Botanist, Silviculturist, Ecophysiologist
    Dr George Hawke, Environmental Scientist
    Dr Margaret Helder, Science Editor, Botanist
    Dr Harold R. Henry, Engineer
    Dr Jonathan Henry, Astronomy
    Dr Joseph Henson, Entomologist
    Dr Robert A. Herrmann, Professor of Mathematics, US Naval Academy
    Dr Andrew Hodge, Head of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Service
    Dr Kelly Hollowell, Molecular and Cellular Pharmacologist
    Dr Ed Holroyd, III, Atmospheric Science
    Dr Bob Hosken, Biochemistry
    Dr George F. Howe, Botany
    Dr Neil Huber, Physical Anthropologist
    Dr Russell Humphreys, Physicist
    Dr James A. Huggins, Professor and Chair, Department of Biology
    Evan Jamieson, Hydrometallurgy
    George T. Javor, Biochemistry
    Dr Pierre Jerlström, Creationist Molecular Biologist
    Dr Arthur Jones, Biology
    Dr Jonathan W. Jones, Plastic Surgeon
    Dr Raymond Jones, Agricultural Scientist
    Dr Felix Konotey-Ahulu, Physician, leading expert on sickle-cell anemia
    Prof. Leonid Korochkin, Molecular Biology
    Dr Valery Karpounin, Mathematical Sciences, Logics, Formal Logics
    Dr Dean Kenyon, Biology
    Prof. Gi-Tai Kim, Biology
    Prof. Harriet Kim, Biochemistry
    Prof. Jong-Bai Kim, Biochemistry
    Prof. Jung-Han Kim, Biochemistry
    Prof. Jung-Wook Kim, Environmental Science
    Prof. Kyoung-Rai Kim, Analytical Chemistry
    Prof. Kyoung-Tai Kim, Genetic Engineering
    Prof. Young-Gil Kim, Materials Science
    Prof. Young In Kim, Engineering
    Dr John W. Klotz, Biologist
    Dr Vladimir F. Kondalenko, Cytology/Cell Pathology
    Dr Leonid Korochkin, M.D., Genetics, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology
    Dr John K.G. Kramer, Biochemistry
    Prof. Jin-Hyouk Kwon, Physics
    Prof. Myung-Sang Kwon, Immunology
    Dr John G. Leslie, Biochemistry, molecular biology, medicine, biblical archaeology
    Prof. Lane P. Lester, Biology, Genetics
    Dr Jason Lisle, Astrophysicist
    Dr Alan Love, Chemistry
    Dr Heinz Lycklama, Nuclear Physics
    Dr Ian Macreadie, Molecular Biology, Microbiology:
    Dr John Marcus, Molecular Biology
    Dr George Marshall, Ophthalmology
    Dr Jim Mason, Nuclear Physics
    Dr Ralph Matthews, Radiation Chemistry
    Dr John McEwan, Chemist
    Prof. Andy McIntosh, Combustion theory, aerodynamics
    Dr David Menton, Anatomist
    Dr Angela Meyer, Creationist Plant Physiologist
    Dr John Meyer, Physiologist
    Dr Albert Mills, Reproductive Physiologist, Embryologist
    Colin W. Mitchell, Geography
    Dr John N. Moore, Science Educator
    Dr John W. Moreland, Mechanical engineer and Dentist
    Dr Henry M. Morris, Hydrologist
    Dr John D. Morris, Geologist
    Dr Len Morris, Physiologist
    Dr Graeme Mortimer, Geologist
    Stanley A. Mumma, Architectural Engineering
    Prof. Hee-Choon No, Nuclear Engineering
    Dr Eric Norman, Biomedical researcher
    Prof. John Oller, Linguistics
    Prof. Chris D. Osborne, Assistant Professor of Biology
    Dr John Osgood, Medical Practitioner
    Dr David Pace, Organic Chemistry
    Dr Charles Pallaghy, Botanist
    Dr Gary E. Parker, Biologist, Cognate in Geology (Paleontology)
    Dr David Pennington, Plastic Surgeon
    Prof. Richard Porter
    Dr Georgia Purdom, Molecular Genetics
    Dr Albert E. Pye, invertebrate zoology, biotechnology, biological control (1945–2012)
    Dr John Rankin, Cosmologist
    Dr A.S. Reece, M.D.
    Prof. J. Rendle-Short, Pediatrics
    Dr Jung-Goo Roe, Biology
    Dr David Rosevear, Chemist
    Dr Ariel A. Roth, Biology
    Dr John Sanford, Geneticist
    Dr Jonathan D. Sarfati, Physical chemist / spectroscopist
    Dr Joachim Scheven Palaeontologist:
    Dr Ian Scott, Educator
    Dr Saami Shaibani, Forensic physicist
    Dr Young-Gi Shim, Chemistry
    Prof. Hyun-Kil Shin, Food Science
    Dr Mikhail Shulgin, Physics
    Dr Emil Silvestru, Geologist/karstologist
    Dr Roger Simpson, Engineer
    Dr Harold Slusher, Geophysicist
    Dr E. Norbert Smith, Zoologist
    Dr Andrew Snelling, Geologist
    Prof. Man-Suk Song, Computer Science
    Dr Timothy G. Standish, Biology
    Prof. James Stark, Assistant Professor of Science Education
    Prof. Brian Stone, Engineer
    Dr Esther Su, Biochemistry
    Dr Charles Taylor, Linguistics
    Dr Stephen Taylor, Electrical Engineering
    Dr Ker C. Thomson, Geophysics
    Dr Michael Todhunter, Forest Genetics
    Dr Lyudmila Tonkonog, Chemistry/Biochemistry
    Dr Royal Truman, Organic Chemist:
    Dr Larry Vardiman, Atmospheric Science
    Prof. Walter Veith, Zoologist
    Dr Joachim Vetter, Biologist
    Dr Tas Walker, Mechanical Engineer and Geologist
    Dr Jeremy Walter, Mechanical Engineer
    Dr Keith Wanser, Physicist
    Dr Noel Weeks, Ancient Historian (also has B.Sc. in Zoology)
    Dr A.J. Monty White, Chemistry/Gas Kinetics
    Dr John Whitmore, Geologist/Paleontologist
    Dr Carl Wieland, Medical doctor
    Dr Lara Wieland, Medical doctor
    Dr Clifford Wilson, Psycholinguist and archaeologist (1923–2012)
    Dr Kurt Wise, Palaeontologist
    Dr Bryant Wood, Creationist Archaeologist
    Prof. Seoung-Hoon Yang, Physics
    Dr Thomas (Tong Y.) Yi, Ph.D., Creationist Aerospace & Mechanical Engineer
    Dr Ick-Dong Yoo, Genetics
    Dr Sung-Hee Yoon, Biology
    Dr Matthew Young, Mechanical Engineering, Robotics
    Dr Patrick Young, Chemist and Materials Scientist
    Prof. Keun Bae Yu, Geography
    Dr Henry Zuill, Biology
    9 answers · 5 days ago
  • Why don’t people realize that “climate science” is flawed and corrupt?

    Best answer: Amazing. Where did you get your degree in Meteorology that allows you to refute the evidence? I know two Meteorologists and they both assure me that climate change is a serious problem. But please, tell me again how my daughter, who graduated with honors, is insane. Or better yet, come to Niagara Falls...and... show more
    Best answer: Amazing. Where did you get your degree in Meteorology that allows you to refute the evidence?

    I know two Meteorologists and they both assure me that climate change is a serious problem.

    But please, tell me again how my daughter, who graduated with honors, is insane. Or better yet, come to Niagara Falls...and bring your dentist.
    9 answers · 6 days ago
  • How would I survive a ballistic missile attack if I was in Hawaii and a real one happens?

    Best answer: heu... Perhaps a fallout shelter... however area out-side of the Shelter will be contaminated with radiation, it will be deemed unfit for habitation, contaminating the soil and water, making subsistence farming and fishing too dangerous for a long time... Radiation and fallout effects on the Marshall... show more
    Best answer: heu... Perhaps a fallout shelter... however area out-side of the Shelter will be contaminated with radiation, it will be deemed unfit for habitation, contaminating the soil and water, making subsistence farming and fishing too dangerous for a long time...

    Radiation and fallout effects on the Marshall Islands
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-hAr3GX4kY
    11 answers · 1 week ago
  • Is the wind caused by trees sneezing? 🤧?

    Best answer: Yes. Some of them are allergic to pollen
    Best answer: Yes. Some of them are allergic to pollen
    8 answers · 1 week ago
  • Stevan says Christianty fought the birth of science. Did it?

    Only Christianity gave birth to science and there are many books that document this, but the grand points are these : THE PRESERVATION OF LITERACY IN THE DARK AGES Because it is a literary religion based on sacred texts and informed by the writings of the early church fathers, Christianity was exclusively... show more
    Only Christianity gave birth to science and there are many books that document this, but the grand points are these : THE PRESERVATION OF LITERACY IN THE DARK AGES Because it is a literary religion based on sacred texts and informed by the writings of the early church fathers, Christianity was exclusively responsible for the preservation of literacy and learning after the fall of the Western Empire. This meant not only that the Latin classics were preserved but also that their were sufficient men of learning to take Greek thought forward when it was rediscovered. DOCTRINE OF THE LAWFULNESS OF NATURE As they believed in a law abiding creator God, even before the rediscovery of Greek thought, twelfth century Christians felt they could investigate the natural world for secondary causes rather than put everything down to fate (like the ancients) or the will of Allah (like Moslems). NEED TO EXAMINE THE REAL WORLD RATHER THAN RELY ON PURE REASON Christians insisted that God could have created the world any way he like and so Aristotle's insistence that the world was the way it was because it had to be was successfully challenged. This meant that his ideas started to be tested and abandoned if they did not measure up. SCIENCE AS A SACRED DUTY features again and again in scientific writing. The early modern scientists were inspired by their faith to make their discoveries and saw studying the creation of God as a form of worship.
    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • Are humans really the first intelligent form of life to evolve on earth?

    Best answer: not too damn likely, given that, if there were, they didn't leave a single trace of their existence that anybody's ever found, even though the bones of creatures from hundreds of millions of years ago are all over the place but of course from a total lack of information you can speculate that... show more
    Best answer: not too damn likely, given that, if there were, they didn't leave a single trace of their existence that anybody's ever found, even though the bones of creatures from hundreds of millions of years ago are all over the place

    but of course from a total lack of information you can speculate that anything's possible.
    6 answers · 1 week ago
  • Are aliens real?

    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • Do the undiscovered scientific facts exist now? We just don't know about it? atheists and religious people?

    Best answer: are you familiar with the definition of science
    Best answer: are you familiar with the definition of science
    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • Why is high ecological footprint bad?

    thanks.
    thanks.
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • What type of Natural-Disaster do you find to be scariest and why?

    Best answer: I would not want to experience a Plinian eruption first-hand, no. Plinian is the term we use for explosive eruptions like the 1980 Mount St-Helens eruption, it comes from Pliny the Younger and his description of the destruction of Pompeii by Vesuvius (which killed Pliny the Elder). About the only good thing about... show more
    Best answer: I would not want to experience a Plinian eruption first-hand, no. Plinian is the term we use for explosive eruptions like the 1980 Mount St-Helens eruption, it comes from Pliny the Younger and his description of the destruction of Pompeii by Vesuvius (which killed Pliny the Elder). About the only good thing about a Plinian eruption would be that it would tend to fry you or suffocate you pretty quickly once the cloud of hot ash got to you. But still, that is awfully close to drowning and I don't particularly want to drown either.

    Earthquakes don't actually frighten me much. Worry me, sure, but they don't scare me really. Tornadoes are pretty freaking scary.
    6 answers · 1 week ago
  • We laugh at what science thought was true 200 years ago, in 200 years time will we be laughing at what science believed was true in 2018?

    Best answer: Yes. We'll also think it's just NUTS that anyone cared which pronouns or bathroom someone used.
    Best answer: Yes. We'll also think it's just NUTS that anyone cared which pronouns or bathroom someone used.
    6 answers · 2 weeks ago