• Does "warm milk" mean "hot milk" ?

    27 answers · 4 days ago
  • Should there always be a comma after 'which' in a sentence?

    For example: The table, which my grandmother gave me, is very heavy. Is this right? Should you ALWAYS use a comma before 'which'?
    For example: The table, which my grandmother gave me, is very heavy. Is this right? Should you ALWAYS use a comma before 'which'?
    9 answers · 1 day ago
  • Why do the news readers say "an horrific" instead of "a horrific"?

    Please explain
    Please explain
    12 answers · 2 days ago
  • Which of these Slang Terms from the 1970's do you use?

    70's slang terms: Give me the skinney, can you dig it, psyche, don't be such a spaz far out, in your face, the man, that's sick, you know (said at the end of every sentence), your mama, catch you on the flip side, chill out man, be cool, fab, keep on truckin, right on, are you decent,... show more
    70's slang terms: Give me the skinney, can you dig it, psyche, don't be such a spaz far out, in your face, the man, that's sick, you know (said at the end of every sentence), your mama, catch you on the flip side, chill out man, be cool, fab, keep on truckin, right on, are you decent, airhead, Bad (being construed as good), Be there or be square, boo-yah, boob tube, bogus, bummer, burn out, burn!, catch my drift, check ya later, catch you on the rebound, chillaxin', cool beans, deadhead, dy-no-mite!, fag hag, for rizzle, far out, the fuzz, gnarly, hip, how's it hangin, I dig it, macking, the low down, neato, nark, outta sight, she's plastic, psyche out, right on, righteous, rock on, totally rad, solid, spiffy, slick, slammin, say what?, shag, rite quick, rip off, relevant, stellar, stoked, that's bogus, stoned, sweetness, tight, to go bananas, veg out, trippy, up your nose with a rubber hose, wipeout, what's the buzz?, word (I agree), Wowzers, your mother, wuddup, pimp
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is HAVE WENT commonly used in spoken American English?

    Have you ever went to the hospital because you thought you were gonna die? vs. Have you ever gone to the hospital because you thought you were gonna die? vs. Have you ever been to the hospital because you thought you were gonna die?
    Have you ever went to the hospital because you thought you were gonna die? vs. Have you ever gone to the hospital because you thought you were gonna die? vs. Have you ever been to the hospital because you thought you were gonna die?
    10 answers · 2 days ago
  • "have" or "has" in this sentence?

    These characteristics show that Jack does not only have feelings of hope and empathy but also (has/have) inner feelings of motivation for others.
    These characteristics show that Jack does not only have feelings of hope and empathy but also (has/have) inner feelings of motivation for others.
    8 answers · 1 day ago
  • Which word is correct?

    Best answer: "Over" is more of a colloquialism. Not wrong, just not literally right. It is definitely an acceptable usage. the correct word would be "on" if you are being strictly literal. You would miss the head if you smacked over it, in a literal sense.
    Best answer: "Over" is more of a colloquialism. Not wrong, just not literally right. It is definitely an acceptable usage. the correct word would be "on" if you are being strictly literal. You would miss the head if you smacked over it, in a literal sense.
    12 answers · 3 days ago
  • What does this mean: “Don’t be so deep in your own evolution that it excites you to see other people struggle to evolve.”?

    Best answer: "Don't toot your own horn."

    I might add that it also means not to be so proud of your own achievements that you take pleasure in the misfortunes of others.
    Best answer: "Don't toot your own horn."

    I might add that it also means not to be so proud of your own achievements that you take pleasure in the misfortunes of others.
    7 answers · 2 days ago
  • What Christmas Song or Tune can you sing word for word along with?

    Best answer: I'm dreaming of a white Christmas
    just like the ones I used to know.
    Where the tree tops glisten
    and children listen
    to hear sleigh bells in the snow.
    I'm dreaming of a white Christmas
    with every Christmas card I write.
    May your days be merry and bright
    and may all your Christmases be white.
    Best answer: I'm dreaming of a white Christmas
    just like the ones I used to know.
    Where the tree tops glisten
    and children listen
    to hear sleigh bells in the snow.
    I'm dreaming of a white Christmas
    with every Christmas card I write.
    May your days be merry and bright
    and may all your Christmases be white.
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Can you imagine how he will be after the exam -> is that grammatically wrong or right?

    can you imagine how he will be after the exam -> is that grammatically wrong or right?
    can you imagine how he will be after the exam -> is that grammatically wrong or right?
    7 answers · 4 days ago
  • What does "thou art" mean in ""Ay, to be sure!" cried Miss Charlotte; "lend my clothes to such a dirty Cinderwench as thou art!"?

    Best answer: thou = you
    art = are

    very old but still used in prayers etc.
    Or poems
    "Where thou art, that is home."
    as Emily Dickinson would say.
    Best answer: thou = you
    art = are

    very old but still used in prayers etc.
    Or poems
    "Where thou art, that is home."
    as Emily Dickinson would say.
    6 answers · 1 day ago
  • Is this grammatically correct/natural?

    “I sometimes say things that I’m not sure make grammatical sense or not.” If not how do I rephrase it?
    “I sometimes say things that I’m not sure make grammatical sense or not.” If not how do I rephrase it?
    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • Which sentence is correct?

    Best answer: The phrase "crashed to the ground" is more commonly used. If a plane crashes into a something, then I would use "into"...The toy plane plunged 10 feet and crashed into the fence. - The toy plane plunged 10 feet and crashed to the ground. - The toy plane crashed to the ground after plunging 10... show more
    Best answer: The phrase "crashed to the ground" is more commonly used. If a plane crashes into a something, then I would use "into"...The toy plane plunged 10 feet and crashed into the fence.

    - The toy plane plunged 10 feet and crashed to the ground.
    - The toy plane crashed to the ground after plunging 10 feet.
    - The toy plane plunged 10 feet then crashed to the ground.
    - The toy plane plunged 10 feet sending it crashing to the ground.
    7 answers · 2 days ago
  • What does this mean?: “You can't move forward until you have honored where you are right now”?

    Best answer: Never heard that one. All of them twisty sayings are open to interpretation. What I glean from that in real time is that a person needs to learn from experiences rather than taking them too hard, and then they move on and evolve.

    Of course, I think I just perpetuated a further vague, twisty saying myself just now.
    Best answer: Never heard that one. All of them twisty sayings are open to interpretation. What I glean from that in real time is that a person needs to learn from experiences rather than taking them too hard, and then they move on and evolve.

    Of course, I think I just perpetuated a further vague, twisty saying myself just now.
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • What does efflorescence (adjective) mean?

    I've searched everywhere online but I can't find anywhere that gives the definition of efflorescence as an adjective.
    I've searched everywhere online but I can't find anywhere that gives the definition of efflorescence as an adjective.
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is his a threat: yes or no? And why?

    “Life is short..let’s make it shorter” Is that a threat and can you explain?
    “Life is short..let’s make it shorter” Is that a threat and can you explain?
    6 answers · 23 hours ago
  • What does the word dormant mean in this context?..?

    Best answer: inactive is pretty well what it means. literally asleep (from french dormir = to sleep, dormant = sleeping). not doing anything active but still alive. sort of like hibernating but usually meaning with even less activity than you would get by simple sleeping. It is asleep, in a sense. Definitely not... show more
    Best answer: inactive is pretty well what it means. literally asleep (from french dormir = to sleep, dormant = sleeping). not doing anything active but still alive. sort of like hibernating but usually meaning with even less activity than you would get by simple sleeping. It is asleep, in a sense. Definitely not "awake".

    Volcanoes are called dormant when they are not erupting or about to erupt, but have erupted relatively recently so could erupt again sometime in the relatively near future. Not extinct, not dead, but not doing anything at the moment either. Dormant.
    7 answers · 2 days ago