• Did Romans create Palestine?

    Is that why Jews always say that Palestine never existed
    Is that why Jews always say that Palestine never existed
    14 answers · 2 days ago
  • What if all Palestinian refugees decided to march into inner Palestine from Gaza this Friday .....???...??...?...?

    none stop march ....just cross the dam fences into Palestine....
    none stop march ....just cross the dam fences into Palestine....
    11 answers · 5 days ago
  • Is Lord Ehrlichmann a Palestinian?

    Is that why he hates Israel so much
    Is that why he hates Israel so much
    7 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is Natalie Portman jewish?

    Best answer: Yes she is. Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem, Israel, to two Jewish parents who, while American, spent a great deal of time in the Holy Land. She moved to the states when she was three, and attended Jewish schools all the way to college. Her real name isn’t actually Natalie Portman, but Neta-Lee Hershlag.... show more
    Best answer: Yes she is.
    Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem, Israel, to two Jewish parents who, while American, spent a great deal of time in the Holy Land. She moved to the states when she was three, and attended Jewish schools all the way to college.
    Her real name isn’t actually Natalie Portman, but Neta-Lee Hershlag. Portman is her maternal grandmother’s maiden name.
    She grew up in Long Island, New York and attended Jewish day school at Solomon Schecter in Glen Cove, New York. She entered the Intel Science Talent Search (ahem, cool nerd alert) in high school and graduated from Syosset High School in 1999.
    She graduated from Harvard in 2003 with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology,
    18 answers · 7 days ago
  • Lived in Israel for almost a year. I return to America, and i'm afraid to leave my house. :( Why is this ?

    Best answer: You're not imagining things; America is a very dangerous country.

    But the numbers make it comparable to Israel: 2011 mortality, due to violence + war is about 4.5 per 100,000, in either country.

    The threat model is different, but you should exercise about the same level of caution.
    Best answer: You're not imagining things; America is a very dangerous country.

    But the numbers make it comparable to Israel: 2011 mortality, due to violence + war is about 4.5 per 100,000, in either country.

    The threat model is different, but you should exercise about the same level of caution.
    8 answers · 5 days ago
  • Why Israel has no respect for it's Constitution?

    Presidents supposed to be there for four years Max but Bibi has been there since 2009!
    Presidents supposed to be there for four years Max but Bibi has been there since 2009!
    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • Where do I get a1040X form?

    4 answers · 6 days ago
  • Who is lord ehrlichmann?

    Best answer: Some time ago, various users claimed that he accidentally doxxed himself and revealed his identity to be Brent from the Midwest, a Muslim convert associated with a very, very hateful imam. I did not see this myself, but I remember trusting those users much more than E himself. Which isn't saying much, tbh,... show more
    Best answer: Some time ago, various users claimed that he accidentally doxxed himself and revealed his identity to be Brent from the Midwest, a Muslim convert associated with a very, very hateful imam. I did not see this myself, but I remember trusting those users much more than E himself. Which isn't saying much, tbh, since I don't trust him very much to begin with.

    The only things I can confirm personally is that he's a very biased user with some demonstrably false things to say about Israel and the Jewish people as a whole. His sweeping generalizations on entire people do not hold up to further scrutiny, and should've been left in the dark ages where they originate. He appears to be here more for propagandist intentions than to express love and solidarity towards the Palestinians. Tbh, I wouldn't be surprised if he didn't care about them irl. While that may not be as uniquely identifying as "Muslim Brent from the Midwest", this too answers the question "who is he".
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Why are Jews so unpopular compared to Greeks and Romans?

    Best answer: Centuries of Christian bias and calumny against Jews. Once Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire, its long-simmering hostility against Jews for refusing to convert broke into the open. It was also no longer expedient to blame Romans for the execution of Christ and Jews became a convenient... show more
    Best answer: Centuries of Christian bias and calumny against Jews. Once Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire, its long-simmering hostility against Jews for refusing to convert broke into the open. It was also no longer expedient to blame Romans for the execution of Christ and Jews became a convenient scapegoat. Jews were persecuted, mistreated, and lied about for 1500 years, culminating in the Holocaust.

    Ironically, for a very long time, Jews and Muslims got along far better than either group did with Christians. That changed with the foundation of Israel.

    Greeks and Romans/Italians became Christians, I might point out, and they still are, at least nominally. Both countries have few Jews.
    17 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • If I sing a popular Christian song about the Opening of the Red Sea by God next Shabbat will it sound offensive to Jews?

    Best answer: Why should it ???
    Best answer: Why should it ???
    4 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Are the Jews in Israel just white European colonialists?

    Best answer: The Jewish people are indigenous to Israel, the birthplace of our identity and our unique culture, we have maintained a documented presence in Israel for over 3,500 years. The families of most Israeli Jews have lived in exile, lived across the Middle East, Africa, and Asia before they returned to our ancestral... show more
    Best answer: The Jewish people are indigenous to Israel, the birthplace of our identity and our unique culture, we have maintained a
    documented presence in Israel for over 3,500 years. The families of most Israeli Jews have lived in exile, lived across the Middle East, Africa, and Asia before they returned to our ancestral homeland in Israel. The Jews who came from Europe are not colonialists. These Jews did not represent a foreign power, they rejected any identification with European nations. These Jews were idealists who sought to restore our unique heritage and fought for the same rights that are granted to any and all peoples: self-determination and independence in their ancestral home.
    Over 150 years ago, Israeli started Jews returning home in large numbers, in the 1860s Israeli Jews again became the majority in the land. In 1920 the international community officially recognized the indigenous rights of the Israeli Jewish people and endorsed the restoration of our Jewish homeland.
    6 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Why do Jews get circumcised?

    Best answer: The truth is, there is no "logical" argument for such an elective procedure. Yet circumcision has been practiced on Jewish males for close to 4,000 years, ever since Abraham was so commanded by God. Why? Let's tackle the issues: It is a foundation of Judaism that we are to control our animal desires... show more
    Best answer: The truth is, there is no "logical" argument for such an elective procedure. Yet circumcision has been practiced on Jewish males for close to 4,000 years, ever since Abraham was so commanded by God. Why?

    Let's tackle the issues:

    It is a foundation of Judaism that we are to control our animal desires and direct them into spiritual pursuits. That's why the Bris is done on the organ where many people unfortunately express "barbaric" behavior. If we bring holiness into our life there, then all other areas will follow.

    Another aspect of circumcision is that it is integral to Jewish identity. This point was made quite powerfully in a movie called "Europa Europa," the true story of a young Jewish boy trying to escape detection by the Nazis. The boy looks Aryan and speaks German fluently, so he poses as a non-Jew and is eventually recruited into an elite training program for the next generation of SS officers.

    This boy was on his way to a fully non-Jewish life, except for one thing: His circumcision. He couldn't hide it. And that is what kept him Jewish throughout the entire ordeal. The man survived the war, and made a new life for himself in Israel. Instead, he may have ended up becoming a Nazi officer. It all depended on the Bris.

    It is a principle of Jewish life that we do not perform mitzvot based on the "practical benefit." At the same time, the mitzvot frequently have positive observable effects in our everyday life.

    Regarding the medical issues, Rabbi Yonason Goldberger writes in "Sanctity and Science":

    As an operation, circumcision has an extremely small complication rate. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine (1990) reported a complication rate of 0.19 percent when circumcision is performed by a physician. When performed by a trained mohel, the rate falls to 0.13 percent or about 1 in 1000. When a complication occurs, it is usually excessive bleeding, which is easily correctable. No other surgical procedure can boast such figures for complication-free operations.

    One reason why there are so few complications involving bleeding may be that, according to recent studies, the major clotting agents, prothrombin and vitamin K, do not reach peak levels in the blood until the eighth day of life. Prothrombin levels are normal at birth, drop to very low levels in the next few days, and return to normal at the end of the first week. One study showed that by the eighth day prothrombin levels reach 110 percent of normal. In the words of Dr. Armand J. Quick, author of several works on the control of bleeding, "It hardly seems accidental that the rite of circumcision was postponed until the eighth day by the Mosaic law."

    Furthermore, circumcision has been known to offer virtually complete protection from penile cancer. According to a recent review article in the New England Journal of Medicine, none of the over 1,600 persons studied with this cancer had been circumcised in infancy. In the words of Cochen and McCurdy, the incidence of penile cancer in the U.S. is "essentially zero" among circumcised men.

    Several studies reported that circumcised boys were 10-to-39 times less likely to develop urinary tract infections during infancy than uncircumcised boys. In addition, circumcision protects against bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections and a variety of other conditions related to hygiene. The extremely low rate of cervical cancer in Jewish women (9-to-22 times less than among non-Jewish women) is thought to be related to the practice of circumcision.

    As a result of studies like these, a number of prestigious medical organizations have recognized the benefits of circumcision, and the California Medical Association has endorsed circumcision as an "effective public health measure."

    The bottom line, however, is that Bris is the sign of the covenant, maintaining one’s spiritual attachment to the Jewish people.



    We find its origin in the book of Genesis. Just 17 chapters into the Torah, Abraham receives a strange command from God:

    You shall be circumcised in the flesh of your foreskin.

    No reason given other than, as God says, it will be a sign of the Eternal covenant between God and Abraham and all of his descendants. The text makes it clear that circumcision must occur on the eighth day of life and falls to every Jewish male. No exception. Those who choose not to obey this commandment, continues God, will be cut off from the Jewish people for breaking this sacred agreement.

    Abraham. The same Abraham who later accepts God’s command to take his son, Isaac, on a three day camping trip and sacrifice him. Without asking a single question. (Spoiler Alert: For those who have yet to read the story, Isaac lives.)

    Nor does Abe ask any questions about circumcising himself and committing all future generations to the same act.

    Not. A. Single. Question.

    We, on the other hand, have plenty of questions. Starting with “why?”

    The text does not explicitly provide a reason. Generations of Rabbinic sages have attempted to answer Abraham’s unasked questions. Because let’s face it—this was a rather unconventional demand. And the Rabbis were anticipating the inevitable questions future generations would have. They have done an admirable job infusing the act with spiritual depth so that the bris is far more than the act of the removal of a piece of skin.

    What we do know is that in Biblical times, ritual circumcision was a defining act for the young Israelite nation and continued to distinguish us from other peoples. From the Hellenistic period on, ruling powers attempted to outlaw circumcision, knowing that it was an essential expression of Jewish faith. Scores of Jewish parents in prior generations risked their, and their sons’, lives to fulfill the Covenant that Abraham made with God. Stories of men forced by the Nazis to pull down their pants in order to determine if they were Jewish still haunt us.

    Contemporary debates about health and sanitary issues are not part of the conversation as far as traditional Judaism is concerned. because ultimately the bris is not done for any practical reason. Nor is it simply a medical procedure.

    It is a sacred act that binds our sons to the thousands of generations who preceded them—and the generations to follow.
    27 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • Jewish Israelites, do you agree Arabs are semites?

    Best answer: Yes, Arabs are Semites. So, you wonder why anti-Semitism means anti-Jew. Well it started in the 19th Century in Germany. There were a lot of Jews in Germany, but few if any Arabs in those days. Jews were the only Semites in Germany. Therefore "Semite" became a pseudo-scientific term for... show more
    Best answer: Yes, Arabs are Semites. So, you wonder why anti-Semitism means anti-Jew.
    Well it started in the 19th Century in Germany. There were a lot of Jews in Germany, but few if any Arabs in those days. Jews were the only Semites in Germany. Therefore "Semite" became a pseudo-scientific term for "Jew." The first "anti-Semites" were proud of being against Jews, and did not even think about Arabs because they were not in Germany.
    That is how the term "anti-Semitic" was coined, and that is why to this day it means anti-Jewish rather than being against all Semites.
    Actually, not all Jews are Semitic racially, since Judaism accepts converts. There are Jews of all races. Similarly, not all Muslims are Semites, since there are Muslims of all races. "Anti-Semitic" is not a literally accurate term, but everybody knows what is meant by it.
    It has had that meaning for about 150 years, if I remember right.
    11 answers · 1 month ago