• Which is your favourite language?

    73 answers · 2 days ago
  • What is "do you know the way?" in french, german and spanish?

    Best answer: In French, the answer to your question depends on what exactly you mean by "way", what you mean by "you" and also in what context you're saying it. Also, it depends if you are talking formally, neutrally or informally. There are 3 ways to ask questions in French. The inversion questions are... show more
    Best answer: In French, the answer to your question depends on what exactly you mean by "way", what you mean by "you" and also in what context you're saying it. Also, it depends if you are talking formally, neutrally or informally.

    There are 3 ways to ask questions in French. The inversion questions are formal, the "est-ce que questions" are neutral and the intonation questions (bascially an affirmative sentence with a question mark in the end) is informal.

    There are 2 "you" in French. The second person singular "tu" is for when you're talking to one friend, member of your family, person you feel close to, peer (particularly in school), child, animal or god. The second person plural is when you're talking to more than one person, whoever it is, or when you're talking to one person you don't know, someone above you (your boss, the mayor, the president, etc) or someone you want to show some extra respect or distance to.
    Additionally, "you" is often used in English as an impersonal subject when French would actually use "on".

    "Way" in English can mean direction or manner. They are translated into several different things in French depending on the information you want to convey.
    For example for a direction, it could be "direction" for a general orientation, "chemin" for a relatively short path or "route" for a longer path.
    For a manner, it could be translated "façon", "méthode", "mannière" or something else.

    So that makes at least 3*3*6 = 54 possible translations for what you asked. And that's not considering that sometimes, sentences are completely reformulated and do not include any of the words of the original sentence it's translated from.

    I know this is annoying and I'm not doing that to bother your. But I wanted you to understand that whenever you ask for a translation into an other language, particularly from a language as sloppy as English in term of grammar, you need to provide a maximum of context if you want to be sure you get what you are looking for.
    5 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is zaro a word in any language?

    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • What language should I learn?

    I would like to become fluent in a language but I am not sure which one. My native language is English, I tried learning German but the pronounciation was hard and the words were very hard. I also did not adjust well to the different grammar rules. What language has similar rules, and is easy to pronounce /... show more
    I would like to become fluent in a language but I am not sure which one. My native language is English, I tried learning German but the pronounciation was hard and the words were very hard. I also did not adjust well to the different grammar rules. What language has similar rules, and is easy to pronounce / spell? I was thinking French or Italian as it is very similar to English but I am not sure. Thank you!
    13 answers · 1 day ago
  • What was the very first language?

    16 answers · 2 days ago
  • Does this sound natural in English?

    "I'm studying for an exam in order to advance my career as an accountant."
    "I'm studying for an exam in order to advance my career as an accountant."
    8 answers · 18 hours ago
  • Is saying "yeah, yeah" considered off hand and impolite?

    When I have daily conversations, I would say "yeah, yeah" in agreement/ acknowledgement. My mum gets offended when I say "yeah, yeah" in our conversations. When I say "yeah, yeah", she mockingly imitates what I just said. Maybe it's the way I say it (my Australian accent is more... show more
    When I have daily conversations, I would say "yeah, yeah" in agreement/ acknowledgement. My mum gets offended when I say "yeah, yeah" in our conversations. When I say "yeah, yeah", she mockingly imitates what I just said. Maybe it's the way I say it (my Australian accent is more twangy than my British-born, Catholic immigrant mother), or the word "yeah" sounds too casual and careless?
    7 answers · 18 hours ago
  • I've been learning French for more than a year and still can't understand spoken French...?

    I can understand written french but I always get lost when I listen to spoken french on television or on the internet. Should I just give up?? Why is this??
    I can understand written french but I always get lost when I listen to spoken french on television or on the internet. Should I just give up?? Why is this??
    15 answers · 3 days ago
  • Does this sound natural in English?

    Best answer: As previous people mentioned, 'studying' fits in a lot better than 'learning'. If you haven't begun your career yet, you cannot advance in it. The sentence would make more sense if it were like ' I'm studying for an exam, so I can pursue the career of an accountant'.
    Best answer: As previous people mentioned, 'studying' fits in a lot better than 'learning'. If you haven't begun your career yet, you cannot advance in it. The sentence would make more sense if it were like ' I'm studying for an exam, so I can pursue the career of an accountant'.
    7 answers · 20 hours ago
  • Is there any problem about speaking English in Quebec (especially Montreal)?

    Best answer: Montreal is very much an English speaking city, so that won't be a problem. Quebec City is more French for sure, so definitely learn some key phrases- they will appreciate the effort that you put into that type of thing. You will be able to get by though, most people in the tourist industry in Quebec City speak... show more
    Best answer: Montreal is very much an English speaking city, so that won't be a problem. Quebec City is more French for sure, so definitely learn some key phrases- they will appreciate the effort that you put into that type of thing. You will be able to get by though, most people in the tourist industry in Quebec City speak some level of English.Once you are there among people that speak French you'll learn a lot more quickly than any lessons will teach you....and it will only cost you some time!
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • What is it called when humans watch people?

    When animals watch people it is called people watching. But what it called when people do it?
    When animals watch people it is called people watching. But what it called when people do it?
    15 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is Mandarin the easiest Asian language to learn since it is the one with most resources?

    Someone told me Thai is easier than Mandarin but there are also no resources in Thai. For this reason learning Thai is actually more difficult than learning Mandarin
    Someone told me Thai is easier than Mandarin but there are also no resources in Thai. For this reason learning Thai is actually more difficult than learning Mandarin
    6 answers · 15 hours ago
  • Is there a beautiful Japanese woman?

    6 answers · 18 hours ago
  • Is learning Greek worth it?

    12 answers · 5 days ago
  • Why do native English speakers often confuse words like they're and their?

    Best answer: And don't forget the unforgettable there. Kids who grow up in the English speaking world learn much of their English at home, from their parents or guardians. So by the time they've hit the first grade, they've already learned bad English if their adults are not well educated. And even when they do... show more
    Best answer: And don't forget the unforgettable there.

    Kids who grow up in the English speaking world learn much of their English at home, from their parents or guardians. So by the time they've hit the first grade, they've already learned bad English if their adults are not well educated.

    And even when they do get to school, it's but for a few hours each day and even less studying English. So when they go home after school they get even more bad English from their parents et al. So yes they speak it every day, but with their peers and adults who are poorly educated. And to a point, speaking English does not differentiate between they're, their, and there as they are homonyms.
    25 answers · 6 days ago
  • Does this sound natural in English?

    Best answer: You could say "with the US plan" or "in the US." But to say "with the US" is not standard English.
    Best answer: You could say "with the US plan" or "in the US." But to say "with the US" is not standard English.
    7 answers · 2 days ago