• Best video camera for under $150?

    Best answer: Videos and photos are different and they require different cameras if you really want great quality in your shots. Ideally, you use a digital camcorder for video and a digital camera for photos but with your highly restrictive budget of $150, all I can think of is... show more
    Best answer: Videos and photos are different and they require different cameras if you really want great quality in your shots. Ideally, you use a digital camcorder for video and a digital camera for photos but with your highly restrictive budget of $150, all I can think of is this.

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1032093-REG/sony_dsc_w830_digital_camera_deluxe.html
    5 answers · 1 month ago
  • I got butter in my Instax mini 9 polaroid, can someone help?

    So a lot of butter got in it and I am not sure if it will work again... any suggestions?
    So a lot of butter got in it and I am not sure if it will work again... any suggestions?
    6 answers · 1 month ago
  • How were 20th century cameras (1900-1999) different from the modern cameras we have today?

    Best answer: Digital photography was just in its baby shoes in 1999. Cameras using film were in their prime by the end of the century, offering autofocus, automated film transport - almost everything a digital camera provides today. Biggest difference: They did not record video, and you could not change the ISO because this was... show more
    Best answer: Digital photography was just in its baby shoes in 1999. Cameras using film were in their prime by the end of the century, offering autofocus, automated film transport - almost everything a digital camera provides today. Biggest difference: They did not record video, and you could not change the ISO because this was determined by the film you were using.
    Cameras of 1900 were mostly big wooden things on a tripod or simply box cameras which you had to send in to have the pics developed. You got a fresh film refill than.That was the beginning of mass used cameras and Kodak lived about one century off it.
    And of course you could not text or phone with them or upload pics to Instagram as for the most time there even was no internet. People did not share pics of their coffee.
    8 answers · 1 month ago
  • Fuji 35mm f2 vs 35mm f1.4?

    So i currently have my 35 f2. It’s an amazing lens but I’ve been thinking to swap it for 35mm f1.4. I mainly use it for blogging (taking portraits, food, fashion stuff) Is this a bad idea?
    So i currently have my 35 f2. It’s an amazing lens but I’ve been thinking to swap it for 35mm f1.4. I mainly use it for blogging (taking portraits, food, fashion stuff) Is this a bad idea?
    6 answers · 1 month ago
  • Is there a URL where I can see videos or images of this Canon advertisement?

    Is there a URL where I can see videos or images of this Canon advertisement?

    Is there a URL where I can see videos or images of this Canon advertisement? I found this ad in New York street corner. I can not find this advertisement even by accessing the Canon USA page.
    Is there a URL where I can see videos or images of this Canon advertisement? I found this ad in New York street corner. I can not find this advertisement even by accessing the Canon USA page.
    3 answers · 1 month ago
  • Film camera (A-1 vs AE-1)?

    Best answer: There were two iterations of the AE-1 which were the AE-1 and the AE-1 Program. The only difference is that the AE-1 Program had a Program mode. The A-1 was an advanced version of the AE-1 Program. The A-1 offered full auto and full manual (just like the AE-1 Program) but it also had aperture and shutter... show more
    Best answer: There were two iterations of the AE-1 which were the AE-1 and the AE-1 Program. The only difference is that the AE-1 Program had a Program mode.

    The A-1 was an advanced version of the AE-1 Program. The A-1 offered full auto and full manual (just like the AE-1 Program) but it also had aperture and shutter priority.

    The AE-1 and AE-1 Program can be fitted with an auto advance which will give you about 1 frame per second. The A-1 can be equipped with an auto winder (1 fps) or a motor drive. The motor drive provided 5 fps and had a larger grip for vertical shooting.

    The A1 has a removable focusing screen. The benefit of this is so you can use a brighter screen such as those from Beetie Screens. Another advantage is being able to clean dust that may fall onto the backside of the screen. Lastly, removable screens allow you to use an all matte screen for macro work. All of these screen are discontinued but you're likely to be able to find a bright Beetie Screen on eBay. The Beetie Screen increased the brightness of the viewfinder by about 1 stop.

    If I remember correctly, the A-1 had faster shutter speeds, too.

    Being higher up in Canon's lineup, the A-1 was better built than the AE-1/AE-1 program.

    It's almost a certainty that any of these models will have a worn piece of foam that is inside the mirror box. This foam cushioned the mirror during the exposure. This isn't a big deal as there are many DYI videos on YouTube showing you how to quickly and easily replace the worn foam. Again, no parts of any kind are available for these models, plus Canon abandoned the FD mount back in the mid 1980s when they switched to the auto-focusing EF mount which Canon has continued to use to this very day.

    Another common issue with the AE-1/Program and A-1 is what I call the Canon whine or chirp. When the mirror moves up and the shutter opens, you will often hear a chirping sound. This is a result of dried lubricants inside the camera which may not have any adverse affect on the camera's operation. You might be able to have the camera serviced a camera shop that that has some bodies that they're using for parts.

    Personally, I'd go with an A-1 over the AE-1 for the reasons stated.

    You should also consider looking at the T-90. The T-90 is probably Canon's best manual-focusing SLR of all time. I owned one of these in the late 80s and sold it about 10 years later for more than what I paid for it. The T-90 was the first camera to have an internal motor drive providing 5.5 fps. It was the first camera to have the exposure index which is found on virtually ever single DSLR made today. This is a scale with a dot that moves up/down depending upon the reflectance value of the subject. This is critical in learning how to properly expose your film. It will allow you to quickly see the how dark or bright anything will be recorded based upon your manual exposure settings. Since you can't chimp with film, and the cost of the film + processing is expensive, the additional cost of a T-90 over an AE-1/AE-1 Program/A-1 will be made up for over time by not having to waste film.

    The T-90 has average metering which is what the AE-1/Program/A-1 has, but it also has center weighted and spot metering. When learning how to meter with the exposure index scale, having a spot meter makes it very easy and precise.

    The T-90 has a digital viewfinder that shows you exactly what the exposure settings are, as opposed to the hoop and needle way of metering used in the early Canon cameras. Again, this just helps you to be that more precise while avoiding wasting film and processing of poorly exposed film.

    The T-90 has the same FD lens mount used on the AE1/proram/A1 cameras. It too has a removable focusing screen. It used a 300 flash that uses TTL for much better flash photos.

    The A1 was used as a backup by professional who used a T-90 or F-1 as their main camera. The T-90 was commonly used by photojournalists throughout the world. It's simply the best manual focusing SLR ever.

    Go to keh.com and see if the have a T-90 in stock.
    5 answers · 1 month ago
  • Hows does the Canon 1ds series and 5d classic perform today?

    Best answer: If you go back to the first iterations like the original 1D, you will see that these cameras had sensors that were nowhere near the quality that you find in a $300 cameras today. The resolution, dynamic range, color and contrast were so horrible, relative to film and modern sensors, that a modern smartphone has... show more
    Best answer: If you go back to the first iterations like the original 1D, you will see that these cameras had sensors that were nowhere near the quality that you find in a $300 cameras today. The resolution, dynamic range, color and contrast were so horrible, relative to film and modern sensors, that a modern smartphone has better image quality. That's pretty amazing considering that the camera modules in smartphones cost about $8 and the early DSLRs were around $15,000.

    This gap between discontinued versions and new models has shrunk considerably over the past 10 years. Here's a link to dpreview.com showing the performance of a 5D Mark II: https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/studio-compare#baseDir=%2Freviews_data&cameraDataSubdir=boxshot&indexFileName=boxshotindex.xml&presetsFileName=boxshotpresets.xml&showDescriptions=false&headerTitle=Studio%20scene&headerSubTitle=Standard%20studio%20scene%20comparison&masterCamera=canon_eos5dmkii&masterSample=img_0036&slotsCount=4&slot0Camera=canon_eos5dmkii&slot0Sample=img_0036&slot0DisableCameraSelection=true&slot0DisableSampleSelection=true&slot0LinkWithMaster=true&x=0&y=0

    To see real-life examples, and not just some setup studio shot, go to 500px.com and do a keyword search for "Canon 5D" which will show you all of the images posted taken with a 5D.
    6 answers · 1 month ago
  • Best camera for indie film making?

    I m a newbie and have been doing research on low budget cameras and can not come to a decision. Which camera is best for VIDEO? I could care less about stills. Ursa mini 4K, Canon 5d mkiv, or a GH5? Thanks!
    I m a newbie and have been doing research on low budget cameras and can not come to a decision. Which camera is best for VIDEO? I could care less about stills. Ursa mini 4K, Canon 5d mkiv, or a GH5? Thanks!
    7 answers · 1 month ago
  • Camera recommendations after Nikon D3300 & D3400.?

    Best answer: Both the D3300 and D3400 are entry-level dSLRs. There's no way but up from them. If you want to simply improve on megapixels, buy the next D3XXX that comes up. If you yearn to have more substance in your shooting experience, buy from at least the next higher class, the D7XXX series. Don't be fooled with the... show more
    Best answer: Both the D3300 and D3400 are entry-level dSLRs. There's no way but up from them. If you want to simply improve on megapixels, buy the next D3XXX that comes up. If you yearn to have more substance in your shooting experience, buy from at least the next higher class, the D7XXX series. Don't be fooled with the D5XXX. All you'll gain is an articulated LCD. Everything else is practically the same with your old cameras. If you want a major step-up, go full-frame. You may have to replace all your lenses going this route. The ultimate upgrade is when you buy a medium format dSLR like the Hasselblad.
    6 answers · 1 month ago
  • Should I start with Canon or Nikon?

    I'm going to be buying my first camera pretty soon here, and I need to decide if I want to buy Canon or Nikon. I think I'm more of a stills guy, which is why I'm leaning towards Nikon (because of their better sensors), but video is something I want to try and could maybe get really into, so I'd want... show more
    I'm going to be buying my first camera pretty soon here, and I need to decide if I want to buy Canon or Nikon. I think I'm more of a stills guy, which is why I'm leaning towards Nikon (because of their better sensors), but video is something I want to try and could maybe get really into, so I'd want to go with Canon (because of their better video features like dual pixel AF) if that happened. I want to figure out what brand to get now because from what I've heard switching is a difficult and expensive decision.
    15 answers · 1 month ago
  • Whats' a good used budget full frame camera 2018 ?

    Best answer: Nikon D700 - A 12MP DSLR from about 2008. At the time, it was a great DSLR if you didn't need a camera with more resolution so that you could make larger prints. With just 12MP, the sensor has very large pixels which make it great for low light work. You can see sample images here, but keep in mind that... show more
    Best answer: Nikon D700 - A 12MP DSLR from about 2008. At the time, it was a great DSLR if you didn't need a camera with more resolution so that you could make larger prints. With just 12MP, the sensor has very large pixels which make it great for low light work.

    You can see sample images here, but keep in mind that unless you use the same quality lens, you won't get the same results since the lens is what determines sharpness, color, and contrast (yes the sensor has some influence, too) among other things: https://www.dpreview.com/sample-galleries/6277130403/nikon-d700-review-samples/0563492672

    This link to dpreveiw.com will show you the ISO performance at all settings: https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/studio-compare#baseDir=%2Freviews_data&cameraDataSubdir=boxshot&indexFileName=boxshotindex.xml&presetsFileName=boxshotpresets.xml&showDescriptions=false&headerTitle=Studio%20scene&headerSubTitle=Standard%20studio%20scene%20comparison&masterCamera=nikon_d700&masterSample=dsc_8418&slotsCount=4&slot0Camera=nikon_d700&slot0Sample=dsc_8418&slot0DisableCameraSelection=true&slot0DisableSampleSelection=true&slot0LinkWithMaster=true&slot1Camera=samsung_ex2f&slot1Sample=sam_0051&x=0&y=0

    While the link above is for older cameras, dpreview has another web-app that shows the ISO performance of the Canon 1Dx Mark II, and the original Sony A7: https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-comparison?attr18=daylight&attr13_0=canon_eos1dxii&attr13_1=sony_a7&attr13_2=apple_iphonex&attr13_3=apple_iphonex&attr15_0=jpeg&attr15_1=jpeg&attr15_2=jpeg&attr15_3=jpeg&attr16_0=100&attr16_1=100&attr16_2=32&attr16_3=32&normalization=full&widget=1&x=0&y=0

    As you can see with this 2nd link, the Canon 1Dx Mark ii does a significant better job at high ISO settings than the Sony A7. However, as expected, the D700 just kills the 1Dx Mark ii at high ISO settings.

    So if high-ISO performance is a major consideration, and you don't print larger than about 11"x14", then go with the D700.

    The 1Dx Mark ii was designed more the for the sports photographer and photojournalists. You see this in it's ability to shoot at 16 fps, vs the D700's 8 fps, and the Sony's 5 fps. Because of its rugged design against shock, moisture and dust, it's a great workhorse of a camera.

    The Canon utilized an USB 3.0 interface which downloads data 10x faster than USB 2.0 which is used by both the D700 and A7.

    The Sony A7 has an advantage over the 1Dx Mark ii and the D700 in that it can use any lens by any brand via lens adapters. Down side to this is that the AF performance suffers. It's been shown that the earlier A7 models work better with Canon brand lenses vs Nikon brand lenses. I say "brand" because the AF performance drops when used with 3rd-party lenses with the Canon EF mount.

    At 24MP, the Sony A7 has the highest resolution of the three cameras. This enables you to print larger while maintaining photo quality prints. However, as the ISO comparison shows, you give up high-ISO performance in order to make larger prints.

    A problem that you will have with the A7 is its focusing speed, or the lack thereof. It uses contrast focusing so it can't keep up with moving subjects like the 1Dx ii or the D700 can. So if you do sports, wildlife or fast moving subjects a lot, then definitely skip the A7 and go with the 1Dx Mark II.

    Here's a side-by-side comparison of major features: https://www.dpreview.com/products/compare/side-by-side?products=canon_eos1dxii&products=nikon_d700&products=sony_a7

    Here's an in-depth review of the actual performance of the A7: https://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/sony-a7/sony-a7A.HTM Most reviews just talk about the same general specifications. Imaging Resource tests these cameras for things like buffer size which is huge if you're constantly shooting at 16fps. A lot of cameras show that they shoot at, say, 10 fps. But they fail to mention that their internal buffer can only hold 5-10 images before the buffer is full and the cameras goes into limp mode where the fps drops to just 1 fps.

    As you can see, these cameras all have weakness and strengths. Depending upon what types of photography you do, and even which lenses you want to use, one will be better than other.
    6 answers · 1 month ago
  • Is it a good idea to by (dslr) canon 1300d with 18-55 mm lens? Does it has good result. ?

    Best answer: If the T6/1300D has the features and capabilities that allow you to get the kinds of shots that you want to get, then it's good enough. Are there better cameras with better resolution and dynamic range? Of course. But the difference isn't going to be huge. In fact, you can easily produce a photo with a... show more
    Best answer: If the T6/1300D has the features and capabilities that allow you to get the kinds of shots that you want to get, then it's good enough. Are there better cameras with better resolution and dynamic range? Of course. But the difference isn't going to be huge. In fact, you can easily produce a photo with a 1300D that significantly better image quality than a 5D Mark IV simply by using a better lens on the T6/1300D. What most people don't realize about image quality is that the lens is doing 90% of the work. A cheap body with a great lens will always have better image quality than an expensive body and a cheap lens.

    Instead of looking at it in terms of image quality, choose the camera body that provides you with the features that you need. This could mean that you go with a Sony or a Pentax. Pentax, for example, is actually a significantly better camera than Nikon or Canon in the entry and middle level of cameras. Pentax has superior build quality such as being weather and dust proof. You don't get that on Canon or Nikon until you spend 2-3 times more money. Pentax is the only DSLR brand to have in-body image stabilization. This allows you to use any lens ever made for the Pentax system and still have a stabilized image up to about 5.5 stops. This feature alone will allow you to get shots that will vastly better than any Canon/Nikon because instead of being at ISO 3200 (for example), you'll be around ISO 200 to get the same shot. That is that power of having in-body image stabilization.

    The Pentax also uses pixel shift for still life and landscape photography. During the shot, the camera moves the sensor 1 pixel at a time. The camera then blends the shots together to produce a sharper image with superior contrast and color that you simply cannot get from any other camera on the market today. This is because of the Bayer pattern on sensors which have many more red pixels than green ones. Moving the sensor allows Pentax to create one image with an equal number red, blue and green pixels. This and many other features are found in all Pentax DSLRs; you don't have to spend a lot to get a lot more than what Canon or Nikon can or do offer. So if you want to put your friends images to shame, then get a Pentax like the K-70.

    Ultimately, it is not the camera, but what you do with it that matters. If you were to compare your friend's shots taken with a DSLR, they would not be as good as a professional using an iPhone. Your decision on subject matter, lighting, composition and exposure settings are what matter most. However, if you want better images out of the Canon system, then you will need to either sell the 18-55mm kit lens that you must buy with the 1300D, or skip the 1300D and buy a higher-end camera that comes body only so that you buy the best lens for your needs and within your budget. You can compare image sharpness of various lenses here: http://www.opticallimits.com

    To find out which cameras have the best ISO performance, go here: https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/image-c...
    5 answers · 1 month ago
  • I dropped my Canon Power Shot 1100 and it won't start. How can I fix it?

    It dropped less than one foot onto a table. The message is "Lens error. Restart camera." I've restarted it, taken out the batteries and smart card and put them back in. No luck.
    It dropped less than one foot onto a table. The message is "Lens error. Restart camera." I've restarted it, taken out the batteries and smart card and put them back in. No luck.
    7 answers · 1 month ago
  • Unlike exclusive digital cameras, why CCD cameras even in smart mobile phones do not have controls on ISO,Speeds, Apertures etc.?

    Best answer: Most smartphones either don't have a variable aperture or when they do, they only have 2 options. Spending the time to develop the firmware while add costs to the design and manufacturing of the phone just so that the user can switch between one of two aperture is not economically feasible. The other reason... show more
    Best answer: Most smartphones either don't have a variable aperture or when they do, they only have 2 options. Spending the time to develop the firmware while add costs to the design and manufacturing of the phone just so that the user can switch between one of two aperture is not economically feasible.

    The other reason is that most people use smartphones as their one-and-only camera. These people don't understand photography, no do they even care about changing settings. To them, additional settings just makes the who thing too complicated. Most people would actually be turned off by the adding more settings because in their mind the camera is just "too complicated" with all of those fancy features like an ISO setting.

    Fortunately for those of us who do care, we can download apps that allow usto have control over the exposure.
    6 answers · 1 month ago
  • I want to buy a Digital Camera Under 300$?

    Sooner I am going to my sister's wedding, and the thing is, I need a good DSLR or Digital camera which should be under 300-400, Which camera I should get from this, the issue is, I'm getting confused by seeing so many choices, but even these are not on that budget. source:... show more
    Sooner I am going to my sister's wedding, and the thing is, I need a good DSLR or Digital camera which should be under 300-400, Which camera I should get from this, the issue is, I'm getting confused by seeing so many choices, but even these are not on that budget. source: https://gadgetsay.com/best-point-shoot-d...
    7 answers · 1 month ago
  • What is a good digital camera?

    I've wanted a decent camera for awhile (all I have currently is the camera on my iPhone) but I'm about to spend a year abroad in Australia, and I really want a good camera for my travels. I don't know much about photography, I'm very much an amateur, so I don't need something super fancy, but I... show more
    I've wanted a decent camera for awhile (all I have currently is the camera on my iPhone) but I'm about to spend a year abroad in Australia, and I really want a good camera for my travels. I don't know much about photography, I'm very much an amateur, so I don't need something super fancy, but I want something that can take good-quality photos and has a decent zoom so I can take pictures from far away without the quality being awful and grainy. Budget-wise, I'm looking for something in the $200-250 range (or less, of course). I really don't know much at all about photography or cameras, so suggestions on specific cameras, camera brands, or places to look for cameras are all appreciated!
    6 answers · 1 month ago
  • Why do I see the edges of my wide angle lens of my canon rebel t6 camera?

    So I just bought a camera and I attached the 58 mm wide angle lens to my other 58 mm original lens. It attaches perfectly but when I’m trying to take a picture and when I have the zoom on 18 it shows the sides of the lens on the screen. I’m doing a project and my professor said he wants the zoom on 18. If I zoom in... show more
    So I just bought a camera and I attached the 58 mm wide angle lens to my other 58 mm original lens. It attaches perfectly but when I’m trying to take a picture and when I have the zoom on 18 it shows the sides of the lens on the screen. I’m doing a project and my professor said he wants the zoom on 18. If I zoom in more the sides of the lens go away, but I can’t do that for my project. So how can I fix this?
    7 answers · 2 months ago