• What does this word mean in English?

    Best answer: We need to see it in context - at least to know what language it's in.

    It could have something to do with blessing or being blessed, assuming it's latin.
    Best answer: We need to see it in context - at least to know what language it's in.

    It could have something to do with blessing or being blessed, assuming it's latin.
    5 answers · 1 day ago
  • Which one is more correct? English Grammar?

    If you have any suggestions message me. or If you got any suggestions message me.
    If you have any suggestions message me. or If you got any suggestions message me.
    7 answers · 3 days ago
  • Is "flinch" an example of onomatopoeia?

    I m doing an English comparison of imagery techniques and was wondering whether "flinch" can be classified as onomatopoeia?
    I m doing an English comparison of imagery techniques and was wondering whether "flinch" can be classified as onomatopoeia?
    4 answers · 20 hours ago
  • Is French a useful language?

    13 answers · 7 days ago
  • Is the last name 'LACOY' German?

    4 answers · 1 day ago
  • Recomendaciones para jugar free fire?

    5 answers · 2 days ago
  • Native English speakers, could you please help me with these issues?

    Best answer: "On" and "In". Those can be tricky for non-native speakers. When talking about physical objects, it's easy. A cup can be ON a table. It can be IN a cabinet. If a cup is ON a cabinet that means you set the cup on the top of the cabinet rather than putting it INSIDE the cabinet. It gets... show more
    Best answer: "On" and "In". Those can be tricky for non-native speakers.

    When talking about physical objects, it's easy. A cup can be ON a table. It can be IN a cabinet. If a cup is ON a cabinet that means you set the cup on the top of the cabinet rather than putting it INSIDE the cabinet.

    It gets even more confusing with geography. The state of Virginia is IN the United States, but it is ON the continent of North America. We think of a continent as an OBJECT, but a country as a set of boundaries. Thus, someone can be IN a country but ON a continent.

    With TIME, I think that's the trickiest of all. A concert can be held ON a certain date, or ON certain days. But we often say of the past, "Back IN those days ... ". I'm not quite sure what the RULE is for when you use "In" and "On" when talking about time.

    I THINK that if you're talking about a SPECIFIC range of dates, you use "on". "On February 4th through February 6th, this meme spread around the internet." But if the time period is more vague, you'd use "in". "In the last few weeks ..." or "In the following weeks ... ".

    You know ... it's something native speakers never give a second thought. It's one of those things we do without even thinking about WHY. I'm sure there's a formal RULE somewhere. I just have no idea what it is.

    When in doubt, "during" would work in both cases.


    "Disseminate" is an okay word. You could use, "Spread across" rather than "Disseminated on".
    4 answers · 2 days ago
  • Should I study french or Spanish?

    I speak English, German, some Scottish Gaelic, and a bit of Hebrew. German and English are easiest. I can hold a conversation in both normally without any issues. Next year I was thinking of taking a language class. Issue is romance languages confuse me. Which should I take?
    I speak English, German, some Scottish Gaelic, and a bit of Hebrew. German and English are easiest. I can hold a conversation in both normally without any issues. Next year I was thinking of taking a language class. Issue is romance languages confuse me. Which should I take?
    9 answers · 5 days ago
  • The food is done is it correct?

    6 answers · 3 days ago
  • Why can't I post a question in the "Languages" section? Please help?

    I've tried about 5 times to submit a question asking about a foreign language and no matter what, it is not posted. I just posted another question in another section (Polls and Surveys) and that was posted instantly. What exactly is going on? Thanks.
    I've tried about 5 times to submit a question asking about a foreign language and no matter what, it is not posted. I just posted another question in another section (Polls and Surveys) and that was posted instantly. What exactly is going on? Thanks.
    4 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is "forgive me" a way to end a sentence?

    10 answers · 6 days ago
  • Learning ojibwe?

    I am attempting to learn ojibwe (my native tongue) but i dont know how to go about learning a language by myself you know and im pretty sure i can do it but i just dont even know where to start
    I am attempting to learn ojibwe (my native tongue) but i dont know how to go about learning a language by myself you know and im pretty sure i can do it but i just dont even know where to start
    4 answers · 2 days ago
  • Why do european accents sound quite similar?

    sometimes when i hear a swedish accent it sometimes sounds french or something. im not an ignorant american. im actually from the uk but i noticed a lot of european accents sound similar when they speak english. does anyone else kind of agree?
    sometimes when i hear a swedish accent it sometimes sounds french or something. im not an ignorant american. im actually from the uk but i noticed a lot of european accents sound similar when they speak english. does anyone else kind of agree?
    6 answers · 1 week ago
  • Is the "f-word" becoming more acceptable?

    I hear it more and more in places I wouldn't have even ten years ago.
    I hear it more and more in places I wouldn't have even ten years ago.
    6 answers · 4 days ago
  • Native English speakers, could you please help me with these issues:?

    Best answer: No, there is no such word as 'threater'. You could perhaps say 'threatener', but it doesn't sound natural. Instead, we would say, "He's always threatening me" or "He's always making threats against me". There is nothing wrong with 'constantly' but it does... show more
    Best answer: No, there is no such word as 'threater'. You could perhaps say 'threatener', but it doesn't sound natural.
    Instead, we would say, "He's always threatening me" or "He's always making threats against me".
    There is nothing wrong with 'constantly' but it does sound a little over-formal.
    6 answers · 4 days ago
  • How to say "My eye speak."in German, Spanish and French?

    Best answer: In French we say: '' Mes yeux parlent '' ( in plural. I never heard it in the singular).

    Now if you absolutely want to say it in the singular, so it's:
    '' Mon œil parle ''.
    Best answer: In French we say: '' Mes yeux parlent '' ( in plural. I never heard it in the singular).

    Now if you absolutely want to say it in the singular, so it's:
    '' Mon œil parle ''.
    7 answers · 5 days ago