• Do you think, environmental pollution does not concern you because you do not come into contact with that?

    Best answer: No, I don't think so. Environmental pollution affects anybody and everybody regardless of the fact whether they are in contact with it or not.
    Best answer: No, I don't think so. Environmental pollution affects anybody and everybody regardless of the fact whether they are in contact with it or not.
    7 answers · Other - Environment · 3 weeks ago
  • Will Fukushima radiation kill Earth before nukes do?

    The abundance of flying insects has plunged by three-quarters over the past 25 years, according to a new study that has shocked scientists. Insects are an integral part of life on Earth as both pollinators and prey for other wildlife and it was known that some species such as butterflies were declining. But the... show more
    The abundance of flying insects has plunged by three-quarters over the past 25 years, according to a new study that has shocked scientists. Insects are an integral part of life on Earth as both pollinators and prey for other wildlife and it was known that some species such as butterflies were declining. But the newly revealed scale of the losses to all insects has prompted warnings that the world is “on course for ecological Armageddon”, with profound impacts on human society.
    14 answers · Other - Environment · 3 weeks ago
  • How to stop bugs from getting in pool?

    Every time I go in my pool I have to scoop out several dead and live bugs. Once I'm done, about thirteen more have showed up. I a very NO BUGS kind of person. I will no stay in my pool if there are bugs. Even tiny little ones that don't harm you.
    Every time I go in my pool I have to scoop out several dead and live bugs. Once I'm done, about thirteen more have showed up. I a very NO BUGS kind of person. I will no stay in my pool if there are bugs. Even tiny little ones that don't harm you.
    10 answers · Other - Environment · 3 weeks ago
  • What are the most extinct animals?

    22 answers · Conservation · 4 weeks ago
  • The more renewables the higher the cost of electricity, is this true?

    Best answer: It depends on what you count as renewables. If you think hydro is renewable then you can have cheap electricity - as long as you do not have to include the cost of building the mountains to make it possible! If you do not have a sufficiently mountainous terrain then you won t be able to use hydro. Parts of Canada... show more
    Best answer: It depends on what you count as renewables.

    If you think hydro is renewable then you can have cheap electricity - as long as you do not have to include the cost of building the mountains to make it possible! If you do not have a sufficiently mountainous terrain then you won t be able to use hydro. Parts of Canada are lucky and they do have cheap electricity.

    However, California, for instance, does not count hydro as a renewable energy source. Places using wind and solar have very high electricity prices. Denmark and, to a lesser extent, Germany both make use of lots of wind and solar. They both have high electricity prices. They both rely on neighbours to make their system work for them. When their neighbours convert they will have serious problems.

    Part of the reason is obvious if you stop to give the intermittency of supply some serious thought. Wind and solar cannot be relied upon to provide a continuous supply. People need electricity the instant they switch things on. To guarantee that you need to retain all the old power stations to fill in for when the wind drops or when the sun does not shine. So you can easily see that there are no savings being made. You have the new solar and wind facilities but you need to keep all the old ones as well.

    Countries that claim most of their energy comes from wind and solar are basing that on average figures. That is as useful as me giving you 365 days worth of fresh food on Jan 1st and expecting that to last you all year. The average works out OK so what is the issue?

    For wind and solar to be useful, the storage problem needs to be solved. That is a cost that has not been factored in yet. Neither have the costs of disposing of wind and solar plants when they are time-expired, disposing of thousands of tonnes of batteries or the costs of keeping existing power stations running in case the wind drops. The costs they claim are not the total costs.
    13 answers · Global Warming · 3 weeks ago
  • What are some scientific solutions to reducing climate change without cutting CO2 emissions?

    So far, I came up with planting more trees or making roads white. Releasing soot into the atmosphere seems silly for many reasons.
    So far, I came up with planting more trees or making roads white. Releasing soot into the atmosphere seems silly for many reasons.
    15 answers · Global Warming · 3 weeks ago
  • Did you hear about this in the media?

    https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/20... Temperature anomalies and percentiles are shown on the gridded maps below. ... Overall, the combined global land and ocean temperature for February 2018 was ... This value was also 0.57°C (1.03°F) cooler than the record high set in 2016
    https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/20... Temperature anomalies and percentiles are shown on the gridded maps below. ... Overall, the combined global land and ocean temperature for February 2018 was ... This value was also 0.57°C (1.03°F) cooler than the record high set in 2016
    12 answers · Global Warming · 3 weeks ago
  • Did you know CA has the most polluted cities in america?

    Did you know CA has the most polluted cities in america?

    8 of the 10 most polluted us cities are in CA
    8 of the 10 most polluted us cities are in CA
    20 answers · Other - Environment · 4 weeks ago
  • The greenhouse effect, how high will surface generated IR reach before being captured and redirected?

    Best answer: The heated air should generate additional IR and also that heated air will also tend to flow upwards (with convection currents), so it will end up going higher than just the first "capture" zone. I think as it goes higher it would be less and less of an effect so the vast majority is near the ground but... show more
    Best answer: The heated air should generate additional IR and also that heated air will also tend to flow upwards (with convection currents), so it will end up going higher than just the first "capture" zone. I think as it goes higher it would be less and less of an effect so the vast majority is near the ground but it still will have an effect high up. It isn't in my expertise though so I'm just speculating. Maybe it would depend on where you draw the line, e.g. a measurable effect.
    6 answers · Global Warming · 4 weeks ago
  • What're you doing against city pollution?

    1)you're using pollution mask and air filters at home. 2)you're using a bike 3)you've an electric second car for the city 4)you've a plug-in hybrid car... 5)you've a bioethanol/biodiesel car 6)your home's a thermal insulation 7)you're using filters for your home heating system
    1)you're using pollution mask and air filters at home. 2)you're using a bike 3)you've an electric second car for the city 4)you've a plug-in hybrid car... 5)you've a bioethanol/biodiesel car 6)your home's a thermal insulation 7)you're using filters for your home heating system
    8 answers · Other - Environment · 4 weeks ago
  • Which is hotter, south america or southern europe?

    Best answer: So America
    Best answer: So America
    10 answers · Other - Environment · 4 weeks ago
  • Will life on Earth end by carbon dioxide starvation?

    Best answer: Volcanic emissions of CO2 have been outweighed by the loss of carbon to calcium carbonate sediments on a multi-million year basis. If this trend continues CO2 will inevitably fall to levels that threaten the survival of plants, which require a minimum of 150 ppm to survive. If plants die, we die. During the last... show more
    Best answer: Volcanic emissions of CO2 have been outweighed by the loss of carbon to calcium carbonate sediments on a multi-million year basis. If this trend continues CO2 will inevitably fall to levels that threaten the survival of plants, which require a minimum of 150 ppm to survive. If plants die, we die.

    During the last glaciation, CO2 bottomed out at 180 ppm, likely the lowest level CO2 has been in the history of the Earth. This is only 30 ppm above the level that plants begin to die. Paleontological research has demonstrated that even at 180 ppm there was a severe restriction of growth as plants began to starve. With the onset of the warmer interglacial period CO2 rebounded to 280 ppm.  But even today, with human emissions causing CO2 to reach 400 ppm plants are still restricted in their growth rate, which would be much higher if CO2 were at 1000-2000 ppm.

    If humans had not begun to unlock some of the carbon stored as fossil fuels, all of which had been in the atmosphere as CO2 before sequestration by plants and animals, life on Earth would have soon been starved of this essential nutrient and would begin to die.

    Our release of CO2 back into the atmosphere has reversed the steady downward slide of this essential food for life.

    Human emissions of carbon dioxide have saved life on Earth from inevitable starvation and extinction due to lack of CO2.
    9 answers · Global Warming · 4 weeks ago