• Did Christopher Columbus set into motion European Imperialism?

    Prior to Columbus, Europe only had small undeveloped kingdoms. Prior to THAT; before Sicilian conquest;Europe north of the Mediterranean was Tribal. Columbus was atrocious, but did his bravery set into motion European empires, a phenomena which lived on up until 1945? A global phenomena which still effects the globe today.
    Prior to Columbus, Europe only had small undeveloped kingdoms. Prior to THAT; before Sicilian conquest;Europe north of the Mediterranean was Tribal. Columbus was atrocious, but did his bravery set into motion European empires, a phenomena which lived on up until 1945? A global phenomena which still effects the globe today.
    7 answers · History · 2 weeks ago
  • Canelo vs Marvin Hagler @ 160lbs?

    If Canelo fought how he fought GGG in the second bout, in the pocket stocking, how would that have worked out against prime Marvelous
    If Canelo fought how he fought GGG in the second bout, in the pocket stocking, how would that have worked out against prime Marvelous
    Boxing · 1 month ago
  • Tyson Fury vs Deontay Wilder winner prediction?

    Result, rounds & why?
    Result, rounds & why?
    5 answers · Boxing · 2 months ago
  • Are animals (aside from humans) sentient?

    Sentient is defined as; the ability to feel or perceive things. Most animals have the same sensory glands and neural receptors found in homosapien [sometimes more acute]. Many, like sharks, even have our senses plus additional senses we simply can't perceive. As for ''feelings'', mammals and ave have almost identical hormonal... show more
    Sentient is defined as; the ability to feel or perceive things. Most animals have the same sensory glands and neural receptors found in homosapien [sometimes more acute]. Many, like sharks, even have our senses plus additional senses we simply can't perceive. As for ''feelings'', mammals and ave have almost identical hormonal chemical makeup in the brain as humans, these are what cause what we call feelings. Some, like elephants and whales, have more exaggerated hormonal activity than homosapiens, pointing to them having more feelings.
    4 answers · Biology · 2 months ago
  • Are animals [aside from humans] sentient?

    Sentient is defined as; the ability to feel or perceive things. Most animals have the same sensory glands and neural receptors found in homosapien. Many, like sharks, even have our senses plus additional senses we simply can't perceive. As for ''feelings'', mammals and ave have almost identical hormonal chemical makeup in the... show more
    Sentient is defined as; the ability to feel or perceive things. Most animals have the same sensory glands and neural receptors found in homosapien. Many, like sharks, even have our senses plus additional senses we simply can't perceive. As for ''feelings'', mammals and ave have almost identical hormonal chemical makeup in the brain as humans, these are what cause what we call feelings. Some, like elephants and whales, have more exaggerated chemical reactions than homosapiens, pointing to them having more feelings. Has science eliminated the dogma that only homosapiens are the only sentient beings?
    2 answers · Zoology · 2 months ago
  • Yi Qi a 4rth group of flying vertebrates?

    Traditionally we know of 3 vertebrates capable of powered flight; pterosaurs, bats and birds. But now another theropoda, Yi Qi, has been discovered in China & shows aerodynamic features. We only have fossils of its head, neck and wings, so we know very little about this animal [we don't know if it had powered flight]. A major difference... show more
    Traditionally we know of 3 vertebrates capable of powered flight; pterosaurs, bats and birds. But now another theropoda, Yi Qi, has been discovered in China & shows aerodynamic features. We only have fossils of its head, neck and wings, so we know very little about this animal [we don't know if it had powered flight]. A major difference with this new specimen is that its wings were membranes, so while it looked like an early flying theropoda, it had bat like wings. Thoughts?
    2 answers · Zoology · 2 months ago
  • Democrats; thoughts on Bernie Sanders?

    Yes; I voted for Hilary. But Sanders is too left for me. Universal healthcare; ok. Housing as a right, universal basic income, free college..? All sound awesome and utopic, but extremely expensive for a nation $22 trillion in debt. If Sanders wins the nomination I will not vote, may even have to vote for Trump.
    Yes; I voted for Hilary. But Sanders is too left for me. Universal healthcare; ok. Housing as a right, universal basic income, free college..? All sound awesome and utopic, but extremely expensive for a nation $22 trillion in debt. If Sanders wins the nomination I will not vote, may even have to vote for Trump.
    9 answers · Politics · 2 months ago
  • Biggest bird species ever was a herbivore that weighed 1,100lbs [non-avian]. 150 million years of evolution, why the size constraint?

    Many of their theropoda cousins got a lot larger. Why?
    Many of their theropoda cousins got a lot larger. Why?
    4 answers · Zoology · 2 months ago
  • Universal healthcare will cost USA $6 trillion yearly, 10x more then our current military expenditure. How will we pay for this?

    Taxing corporations more may lead to a similar result as Detroit.
    Taxing corporations more may lead to a similar result as Detroit.
    16 answers · Politics · 2 months ago
  • Why did pterosaurs have hair?

    Several pterosaur specimen were shown to have been covered in pycnofibers. Pycnofibers evolved separate from mammal fur but are physically identical. Only warm blooded animals today have fur, even small strains of hair/fur create an insulation effect. Why would pterosaurs have fur? What reason, aside from the possibility of them being endothermic?
    Several pterosaur specimen were shown to have been covered in pycnofibers. Pycnofibers evolved separate from mammal fur but are physically identical. Only warm blooded animals today have fur, even small strains of hair/fur create an insulation effect. Why would pterosaurs have fur? What reason, aside from the possibility of them being endothermic?
    6 answers · Zoology · 3 months ago
  • Why are far left democrats blaming poverty on the rich/wealthy?

    Rich/wealthy earned and worked for their wealth, or their ancestors did. The poorest places on earth don't have rich/wealthy. Cuba, Venezuela & USSR all blamed the rich/wealthy, so they took their wealth and got rid of them, look what happened. Detroit blamed the rich and wealthy so they left. Now Detroit is a $h!t whole city
    Rich/wealthy earned and worked for their wealth, or their ancestors did. The poorest places on earth don't have rich/wealthy. Cuba, Venezuela & USSR all blamed the rich/wealthy, so they took their wealth and got rid of them, look what happened. Detroit blamed the rich and wealthy so they left. Now Detroit is a $h!t whole city
    10 answers · Politics · 3 months ago
  • Did birds lead to the extinction of other dinosaur?

    Only small & unspecialized vertebrates survives the major mass extinctions. By the late cretaceous birds dominated small organism niches in the dinosaur world. In that time frame: 1. Birds were the smallest theropoda. Small non-avian unspecialized theropods like saltopus or Procomsognathus [who could have possibly survived the cretaceous... show more
    Only small & unspecialized vertebrates survives the major mass extinctions. By the late cretaceous birds dominated small organism niches in the dinosaur world. In that time frame: 1. Birds were the smallest theropoda. Small non-avian unspecialized theropods like saltopus or Procomsognathus [who could have possibly survived the cretaceous event, like they survived the Triassic] were long gone. 2. The only sauropods left were titanosaurs, which were all huge. Ornithiscians pushed them away from smaller niches, but being a titan dependent on a lot of food is a sure way to go extinct during climate change. 3. Ornithischian, the most dominant and diverse dinosaur family in the cretaceous, did not fill many small animal niches, their smallest member at the time was the size of a large chicken, which is too big/needs too much food to survive an major extinction event [especially when you consider dinosaur metabolism]. 4. Pterosaurs are not dinosaurs but late cretaceous birds took many of their niches, only highly specialized pterosaurs remained. Some were HUGE. It seems Ornithiscians doomed the sauropods, and birds doomed other theropods, Ornithiscians & pterosaurs. Mammals survived because they filled the same niche small therapsids filled [burrowing scavengers], and reptiles along with amphibians, have filled the same niches [and still do] which have seen them through most mass extinctions. It seems birds doomed other dinosaurs. Thoughts?
    5 answers · Zoology · 3 months ago
  • Which flying vertebrate in history [Pterosaurs, Mammals, Birds] is/was the best equipped [biomechanics] to survive? Why?

    Pterosaurs may be extinct, but they had a longer history and filled far more niches. Don't base assessment on just todays fauna. Bats may diversify more, or bats _ birds could be extinct in 3 million years, who knows? Lets stick to biomechanics. Tale of the tape: Pterosaurs: First appeared near 228 million years ago, went extinct 66 million... show more
    Pterosaurs may be extinct, but they had a longer history and filled far more niches. Don't base assessment on just todays fauna. Bats may diversify more, or bats _ birds could be extinct in 3 million years, who knows? Lets stick to biomechanics. Tale of the tape: Pterosaurs: First appeared near 228 million years ago, went extinct 66 million years ago [162 million year history]. Bones: Hollow Wings: Webbed Thermal regulation: unknown, believed to be endothermic Birds: First appeared near 150 million years ago, still alive and in this age thriving [150 million year history]. Bones: Hollow Wings: Feathers Thermal regulation: Endothermic Bats: First appeared near 55 million years ago, still alive in this age [55 million year history]. Bones: Hollow Wings: Webbed Thermal regulation: endothermic
    4 answers · Zoology · 3 months ago
  • Which of these species is the deadliest carnivorous/omnivorous land mammal of all time?

    [Human species excluded] a. Deaodon b. Arctotherium c. American Lion d. Smilodon
    [Human species excluded] a. Deaodon b. Arctotherium c. American Lion d. Smilodon
    2 answers · Zoology · 3 months ago